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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The US has little credibility left: Syria won't change that (Guardian)

Obama's argument for intervention is a hollow one: America's use of chemical weapons in Falluja makes that clear, writes Gary Younge.

2. Revamping Labour's union ties could help Ed Miliband (Independent)

Some activists see Blairite diehards trying to ‘break the link’ – but this is at best paranoid, says Rob Marchant. 

3. Milisecond (n): the time it takes Ed to do the unions’ bidding (Daily Telegraph)

The Falkirk debacle shows Labour is still in hock to Unite – and that’s bad for all of us, writes Boris Johnson.

4. Abbott and the BoreCons show how to win (Times)

The new Australian PM is no fire-breathing ideologue, writes Tim Montgomerie. Like Angela Merkel, he is not afraid to be dull.

5. People despise politicians – but whose fault is that? (Guardian)

I've played my own part in giving MPs a bad name, but ultimately it's Rupert Murdoch's media machine that corrodes public trust, says Chris Huhne.

6. Only a new wave of socialism can end the great squeeze on us all (Independent)

We must break with the free market consensus established by Thatcher, says Owen Jones.

7. A trap of the president’s making (Financial Times)

Obama’s characteristic caution has put him in a perilous position, says Edward Luce.

8. What will drive growth? This recovery could turn out to be a flash in the pan (Independent)

It is now 66 months since the start of the recession and GDP is still 2.9 per cent down, writes David Blanchflower. 

9. The Labour party must get ready for the next generation (Guardian)

To be relevant in the digital age, the Labour party must be more pluralist and retain its trade union links, says Tom Watson.

10. China will stay the course on growth (Financial Times)

Asian countries have enhanced their capabilities to fend off risks, writes Li Keqiang.