Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. War comes to Syria's quiet Christian hinterland (Independent on Sunday)

A rebel attack on Maloula is a warning for a minority accused of supporting government, says Patrick Cockburn.

2. On the trail of the ideal school, no 'love sticks' required (Independent on Sunday)

Michael Gove tells teachers as they prepare to strike over pay and conditions that their profession has never been more rewarding, reports Jane Merrick.

3. Ed Miliband can't retreat from his battle with the union bosses (Observer)

Victory for the Labour leader would be good for him, bad for the Tories and best for the way we do politics, writes Andrew Rawnsley.

4. It's still a family affair if you want to succeed in Britain (Observer)

You don't have to marry a prince to get to the top when even egalitarian Labour favours political dynasties, writes Catherine Bennett.

5. The golden age of inquisition dies with Frost (Sunday Times) (£)

David Frost's death is a reminder that the golden age of openness has passed, says Adam Boulton.

6. Now the recovery’s starting, are we all in that together, too? (Sunday Times) (£)

Ministers are being very, very careful not to utter the phrase “green shoots”, observes Camilla Cavendish.

7. We can’t pretend the world didn’t change after September 11 (Sunday Telegraph)

Our political class is ignoring the great question post-9/11: how to ensure the regions that spawned terror are stable, says Matthew d'Ancona.

8. Miliband must improve fast ahead of his crucial TUC speech (Mail on Sunday)

His efforts will be in vain if he does not recharge our economic and foreign policies, says David Blunkett.

9. Etiquette can't manage our mobile addiction (Sunday Telegraph)

Debrett's guide to using our phones politely is all very well, but we need to go cold turkey, argues Jenny McCartney.

10. KitKat for Google? Give us a break… (Observer)

Only Google executives know why they've named their new operating system after a snack owned by the appalling Nestlé, says David Mitchell.

Grant Shapps on the campaign trail. Photo: Getty
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Grant Shapps resigns over Tory youth wing bullying scandal

The minister, formerly party chairman, has resigned over allegations of bullying and blackmail made against a Tory activist. 

Grant Shapps, who was a key figure in the Tory general election campaign, has resigned following allegations about a bullying scandal among Conservative activists.

Shapps was formerly party chairman, but was demoted to international development minister after May. His formal statement is expected shortly.

The resignation follows lurid claims about bullying and blackmail among Tory activists. One, Mark Clarke, has been accused of putting pressure on a fellow activist who complained about his behaviour to withdraw the allegation. The complainant, Elliot Johnson, later killed himself.

The junior Treasury minister Robert Halfon also revealed that he had an affair with a young activist after being warned that Clarke planned to blackmail him over the relationship. Former Tory chair Sayeedi Warsi says that she was targeted by Clarke on Twitter, where he tried to portray her as an anti-semite. 

Shapps appointed Mark Clarke to run RoadTrip 2015, where young Tory activists toured key marginals on a bus before the general election. 

Today, the Guardian published an emotional interview with the parents of 21-year-old Elliot Johnson, the activist who killed himself, in which they called for Shapps to consider his position. Ray Johnson also spoke to BBC's Newsnight:


The Johnson family claimed that Shapps and co-chair Andrew Feldman had failed to act on complaints made against Clarke. Feldman says he did not hear of the bullying claims until August. 

Asked about the case at a conference in Malta, David Cameron pointedly refused to offer Shapps his full backing, saying a statement would be released. “I think it is important that on the tragic case that took place that the coroner’s inquiry is allowed to proceed properly," he added. “I feel deeply for his parents, It is an appalling loss to suffer and that is why it is so important there is a proper coroner’s inquiry. In terms of what the Conservative party should do, there should be and there is a proper inquiry that asks all the questions as people come forward. That will take place. It is a tragic loss of a talented young life and it is not something any parent should go through and I feel for them deeply.” 

Mark Clarke denies any wrongdoing.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.