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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman

1. War comes to Syria's quiet Christian hinterland (Independent on Sunday)

A rebel attack on Maloula is a warning for a minority accused of supporting government, says Patrick Cockburn.

2. On the trail of the ideal school, no 'love sticks' required (Independent on Sunday)

Michael Gove tells teachers as they prepare to strike over pay and conditions that their profession has never been more rewarding, reports Jane Merrick.

3. Ed Miliband can't retreat from his battle with the union bosses (Observer)

Victory for the Labour leader would be good for him, bad for the Tories and best for the way we do politics, writes Andrew Rawnsley.

4. It's still a family affair if you want to succeed in Britain (Observer)

You don't have to marry a prince to get to the top when even egalitarian Labour favours political dynasties, writes Catherine Bennett.

5. The golden age of inquisition dies with Frost (Sunday Times) (£)

David Frost's death is a reminder that the golden age of openness has passed, says Adam Boulton.

6. Now the recovery’s starting, are we all in that together, too? (Sunday Times) (£)

Ministers are being very, very careful not to utter the phrase “green shoots”, observes Camilla Cavendish.

7. We can’t pretend the world didn’t change after September 11 (Sunday Telegraph)

Our political class is ignoring the great question post-9/11: how to ensure the regions that spawned terror are stable, says Matthew d'Ancona.

8. Miliband must improve fast ahead of his crucial TUC speech (Mail on Sunday)

His efforts will be in vain if he does not recharge our economic and foreign policies, says David Blunkett.

9. Etiquette can't manage our mobile addiction (Sunday Telegraph)

Debrett's guide to using our phones politely is all very well, but we need to go cold turkey, argues Jenny McCartney.

10. KitKat for Google? Give us a break… (Observer)

Only Google executives know why they've named their new operating system after a snack owned by the appalling Nestlé, says David Mitchell.