Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. War comes to Syria's quiet Christian hinterland (Independent on Sunday)

A rebel attack on Maloula is a warning for a minority accused of supporting government, says Patrick Cockburn.

2. On the trail of the ideal school, no 'love sticks' required (Independent on Sunday)

Michael Gove tells teachers as they prepare to strike over pay and conditions that their profession has never been more rewarding, reports Jane Merrick.

3. Ed Miliband can't retreat from his battle with the union bosses (Observer)

Victory for the Labour leader would be good for him, bad for the Tories and best for the way we do politics, writes Andrew Rawnsley.

4. It's still a family affair if you want to succeed in Britain (Observer)

You don't have to marry a prince to get to the top when even egalitarian Labour favours political dynasties, writes Catherine Bennett.

5. The golden age of inquisition dies with Frost (Sunday Times) (£)

David Frost's death is a reminder that the golden age of openness has passed, says Adam Boulton.

6. Now the recovery’s starting, are we all in that together, too? (Sunday Times) (£)

Ministers are being very, very careful not to utter the phrase “green shoots”, observes Camilla Cavendish.

7. We can’t pretend the world didn’t change after September 11 (Sunday Telegraph)

Our political class is ignoring the great question post-9/11: how to ensure the regions that spawned terror are stable, says Matthew d'Ancona.

8. Miliband must improve fast ahead of his crucial TUC speech (Mail on Sunday)

His efforts will be in vain if he does not recharge our economic and foreign policies, says David Blunkett.

9. Etiquette can't manage our mobile addiction (Sunday Telegraph)

Debrett's guide to using our phones politely is all very well, but we need to go cold turkey, argues Jenny McCartney.

10. KitKat for Google? Give us a break… (Observer)

Only Google executives know why they've named their new operating system after a snack owned by the appalling Nestlé, says David Mitchell.

Getty
Show Hide image

Meet the MPs who still think they have a chance of defeating Brexit

A crossparty group of MPs believe they have a right to vote Brexit down in the House of Commons. 

The decision on 23 June was final. With the ballots cast, the nation’s voters started the conveyor belt that would take the United Kingdom in only one direction - Brexit. It was independence day, or Brexitpocalypse, depending on your point of view.

But some MPs think differently. A growing handful of of crossparty MPs who backed Remain are now saying they will vote against Brexit if offered the chance. 

With Article 50 yet to be triggered, they still have an opportunity to influence what happens next. But the decision also raises questions about democracy. What is an MP’s role at this point of national crisis? To respect the will of the majority? Or to fight for their individual constituents?

David Lammy, the Labour MP for Tottenham (pictured), has led the charge for a second vote on Brexit.

He points out the referendum was “advisory, non-binding”, and argues it should be up to Parliament to make the final decision

In a series of tweets, he said:  “Our Parliament is sovereign and must approve any Brexit.

“My position is clear. I will never vote for Brexit or to invoke Article 50. On behalf of my constituents and the young people of this country I will not do it. Three quarters of my constituents voted to Remain, and I will continue to stand up for them.”

Lammy isn’t the only one to invoke the will of his constituents. Another Labour MP, Catherine West, represents Hornsey and Wood Green. In Haringey, the overlapping local authority, three quarters of voters chose to Remain. 

West tweeted: “I stand with them on this issue and I will vote against Brexit in Parliament.”

Daniel Zeichner, the Labour MP for the Europhile island of Cambridge, has also pledged to vote Remain. Geraint Davies, a Welsh Labour MP and Jonathan Edwards, from Welsh nationalist party Plaid Cymru, have submitted a formal notice to Parliament demanding a second referendum "on the terms of leaving the EU". 

Perhaps it is not surprising English and Welsh MPs are taking such a stubborn view. Short of following Scotland’s example and demanding London’s independence, they have few other options.

But the MPs’ resistance also brings up a thorny political question. A majoritarian vote is only one part of democracy after all. Constituency MPs and minority protections are also part of the mix. 

There may also be an argument that responsible MPs should act in voters’ best interests - even if that is against the wishes of the voters themselves. 

Speaking in the House of Commons, Tory grandee Ken Clarke noted MPs were yet to actually hear the details of what Brexit Britain would look like. 

He asked the Prime Minister:

“Does my right hon. Friend agree that we still have a parliamentary democracy and it would be the duty of each Member of Parliament to judge each measure in the light of what each man and woman regards as the national interest, and not to take broad guidance from a plebiscite which has produced a small majority on a broad question after a bad-tempered and ill-informed debate?”

It is not a straightforward democratic case. But with two parties divided, a 300-year-old union in jeopardy and the peace process in Northern Ireland under pressure, MPs might be tempted to put the patriot’s argument first.