Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Why Iain Duncan Smith is no longer a quiet man but a dangerous one (Guardian)

His response to the damning NAO report on universal credit shows that he appears to rely on his gut feeling rather than facts, says Marina Hyde.

2. The west needs a replacement for the warrior spirit (Financial Times) (£)

Warfare and welfare have long been connected, writes Mark Mazower.

3. False feminists want to make abortion harder (Times) (£)

There is no ‘gendercide’ problem with baby girls in Britain, just the agenda of anti-choice zealots, argues Janice Turner.

4. Syria crisis: The teetering balance of power has whole region on edge (Independent)

Israel’s position is firmly based on its own self-interests, writes Patrick Cockburn.

5. How’s the economy? Don’t ask economists (Times) (£)

The recent good news may be welcome but it certainly wasn’t predicted by a slew of so-called experts, says Matthew Parris.

6. What next for our 'small island’ and its dwindling Armed Forces? (Telegraph)

Our political leaders’ cloying rhetoric masks a confusion about what Britain is fighting for, writes Charles Moore.

7. Ed Miliband's tormentors ignore the constraints of leadership (Guardian)

His critics show a wilful misunderstanding of what it means to lead the opposition and the responsibilities it brings, says Steve Richards.

8. Memo to our leaders: real men take responsibility (Independent)

The people of Britain are heartily sick of macho posturing on the part of public figures, argues Yasmin Alibhai-Brown.

9. One signature by Assad could help to avert the bombing (Times) (£)

Getting him to sign the chemical weapons convention is an alternative to war, says Gabrielle Rifkind.

10. Gordon Brown is right – but for all the wrong reasons (Telegraph)

The former Labour leader came out of purdah to argue against the SNP, says Graeme Archer.

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Is anyone prepared to solve the NHS funding crisis?

As long as the political taboo on raising taxes endures, the service will be in financial peril. 

It has long been clear that the NHS is in financial ill-health. But today's figures, conveniently delayed until after the Conservative conference, are still stunningly bad. The service ran a deficit of £930m between April and June (greater than the £820m recorded for the whole of the 2014/15 financial year) and is on course for a shortfall of at least £2bn this year - its worst position for a generation. 

Though often described as having been shielded from austerity, owing to its ring-fenced budget, the NHS is enduring the toughest spending settlement in its history. Since 1950, health spending has grown at an average annual rate of 4 per cent, but over the last parliament it rose by just 0.5 per cent. An ageing population, rising treatment costs and the social care crisis all mean that the NHS has to run merely to stand still. The Tories have pledged to provide £10bn more for the service but this still leaves £20bn of efficiency savings required. 

Speculation is now turning to whether George Osborne will provide an emergency injection of funds in the Autumn Statement on 25 November. But the long-term question is whether anyone is prepared to offer a sustainable solution to the crisis. Health experts argue that only a rise in general taxation (income tax, VAT, national insurance), patient charges or a hypothecated "health tax" will secure the future of a universal, high-quality service. But the political taboo against increasing taxes on all but the richest means no politician has ventured into this territory. Shadow health secretary Heidi Alexander has today called for the government to "find money urgently to get through the coming winter months". But the bigger question is whether, under Jeremy Corbyn, Labour is prepared to go beyond sticking-plaster solutions. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.