Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Why Iain Duncan Smith is no longer a quiet man but a dangerous one (Guardian)

His response to the damning NAO report on universal credit shows that he appears to rely on his gut feeling rather than facts, says Marina Hyde.

2. The west needs a replacement for the warrior spirit (Financial Times) (£)

Warfare and welfare have long been connected, writes Mark Mazower.

3. False feminists want to make abortion harder (Times) (£)

There is no ‘gendercide’ problem with baby girls in Britain, just the agenda of anti-choice zealots, argues Janice Turner.

4. Syria crisis: The teetering balance of power has whole region on edge (Independent)

Israel’s position is firmly based on its own self-interests, writes Patrick Cockburn.

5. How’s the economy? Don’t ask economists (Times) (£)

The recent good news may be welcome but it certainly wasn’t predicted by a slew of so-called experts, says Matthew Parris.

6. What next for our 'small island’ and its dwindling Armed Forces? (Telegraph)

Our political leaders’ cloying rhetoric masks a confusion about what Britain is fighting for, writes Charles Moore.

7. Ed Miliband's tormentors ignore the constraints of leadership (Guardian)

His critics show a wilful misunderstanding of what it means to lead the opposition and the responsibilities it brings, says Steve Richards.

8. Memo to our leaders: real men take responsibility (Independent)

The people of Britain are heartily sick of macho posturing on the part of public figures, argues Yasmin Alibhai-Brown.

9. One signature by Assad could help to avert the bombing (Times) (£)

Getting him to sign the chemical weapons convention is an alternative to war, says Gabrielle Rifkind.

10. Gordon Brown is right – but for all the wrong reasons (Telegraph)

The former Labour leader came out of purdah to argue against the SNP, says Graeme Archer.

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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.