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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Osborne has an economic recovery, but what sort? (Daily Telegraph)

The Chancellor’s plan is to fire up demand and hope sustained growth follows in its wake, writes Jeremy Warner. 

2. No one is left to enforce the rules (Financial Times)

Europe’s posture in the face of Middle East unrest is best described as hiding under the bedcovers, writes Philip Stephens.

3. Russia and the US are closer than we think (Times)

When the smoke clears, both sides are set on stopping extremists taking over Syria, writes Tony Brenton.

4. On Syria, we have allowed Labour policy to be dictated by the government (Guardian)

Ed Miliband was right to halt Cameron's 'rush to war', says Ben Bradshaw. But now is the time to reflect, as a party, on our own position.

5. We need a law to end gender-specific abortions (Daily Telegraph)

Terminations based on sex are a disgrace that most politicians would rather ignore, says Fraser Nelson.

6. Whose recovery is this? That's the great general election question (Guardian)

If competition over living standards for low and middle earners does become the next battleground, that's cause for celebration, writes Polly Toynbee.

7. Labour can’t allow the unions to win this (Times)

The GMB union has called Ed Miliband’s bluff, writes Philip Collins. Despite the financial cost to the party, he must stand firm.

8. The bravery of women like Asma Jahangir shines through Pakistan’s murky history (Independent)

The laws repealed are testament to what can be achieved, writes Peter Popham. 

9. The judicial review system is not a promotional tool for countless left-wing campaigners (Daily Mail)

Britain cannot afford to allow a culture of left-wing-dominated, single-issue activism to hold back our country from investing in infrastructure and new sources of energy, says Chris Grayling. 

10. New York’s farewell to America’s mayor (Financial Times)

The high-profile post could be taken by a candidate grounded in humble issues, writes Gary Silverman.