Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The early years educational underclass is a handy moralisers' myth (Guardian)

Iain Duncan Smith's thinktank finds dubious ways to lay the blame for poverty on the parents and children that suffer it, says Zoe Williams.

2. Ed Miliband is no leader. He is a vulture (Times)

The Syria vote crystallised his failings, says David Aaronovitch. He waits for mistakes, then like a scavenger exploits them.

3. Ed Miliband was good on Syria. But he'll soon be given a Kinnock-style kicking (Guardian)

The Tories are bruised, writes Martin Kettle. So prepare for the most sustained character assassination in British politics since the 90s.

4. At last, the blue-chip hackers are about to be exposed. But I still fear a whitewash (Daily Mail)

If the matter is soon buried by the authorities, we can only conclude that there is one law for large companies — and another for the press, writes Stephen Glover.

5. Though Labour has rolled back on interventionism, the doctrine still survives (Independent)

US and British foreign policy has undergone an adjustment, not a transformation, writes John Rentoul. 

6. Morsi was running a coup, not a democracy (Times)

Egypt’s deposed leader was the frontman for a totalitarian sect that ignored demands for social justice, says Michael Burleigh. 

7. The questions that have to be answered about our bloated BBC (Daily Telegraph)

Lavish pay-offs and a City bonus culture have tainted a corporation that belongs to us all, writes Peter Oborne. 

8. UK economy calls for cautious optimism (Financial Times)

Several years of very easy monetary policy might at last be having an effect, writes Gavyn Davies.

9. Labour is broke and has no back-up plan (Daily Telegraph)

With ties to the unions and their funds severed, Miliband needs to find a new source of income, says Dan Hodges.

10. How social media delivered the Syria defeat (Daily Telegraph)

Politicians will have to work harder to justify their policies now that voters can tweet MPs, says Sue Cameron. 

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.
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Jeremy Corbyn challenged by Labour MPs to sack Ken Livingstone from defence review

Former mayor of London criticised at PLP meeting over comments on 7 July bombings. 

After Jeremy Corbyn's decision to give Labour MPs a free vote over air strikes in Syria, tonight's Parliamentary Labour Party (PLP) meeting was less fractious than it could have been. But one grandee was still moved to declare that the "ferocity" of the attacks on the leader made it the most "uplifting" he had attended.

Margaret Beckett, the former foreign secretary, told the meeting: "We cannot unite the party if the leader's office is determined to divide us." Several MPs said afterwards that many of those who shared Corbyn's opposition to air strikes believed he had mishandled the process by appealing to MPs over the heads of the shadow cabinet and then to members. David Winnick declared that those who favoured military action faced a "shakedown" and deselection by Momentum activists. "It is completely unacceptable. They are a party within a party," he said of the Corbyn-aligned group. The "huge applause" for Hilary Benn, who favours intervention, far outweighed that for the leader, I'm told. 

There was also loud agreement when Jack Dromey condemned Ken Livingstone for blaming Tony Blair's invasion of Iraq for the 7 July 2005 bombings. Along with Angela Smith MP, Dromey demanded that Livingstone be sacked as the co-chair of Labour's defence review. Significantly, Benn said aftewards that he agreed with every word Dromey had said. Corbyn's office has previously said that it is up to the NEC, not the leader, whether the former London mayor holds the position. In reference to 7 July, an aide repeated Corbyn's statement that he preferred to "remember the brilliant words Ken used after 7/7". 

As on previous occasions, MPs complained that the leader failed to answer the questions that were put to him. A shadow minister told me that he "dodged" one on whether he believed the UK should end air strikes against Isis in Iraq. In reference to Syria, a Corbyn aide said afterwards that "There was significant support for the leader. There was a wide debate, with people speaking on both sides of the arguments." After David Cameron's decision to call a vote on air strikes for Wednesday, leaving only a day for debate, the number of Labour MPs backing intervention is likely to fall. One shadow minister told me that as few as 40-50 may back the government, though most expect the total to be closer to the original figure of 99. 

At the end of another remarkable day in Labour's history, a Corbyn aide concluded: "It was always going to be a bumpy ride when you have a leader who was elected by a large number outside parliament but whose support in the PLP is quite limited. There are a small number who find it hard to come to terms with that result."

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.