Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The early years educational underclass is a handy moralisers' myth (Guardian)

Iain Duncan Smith's thinktank finds dubious ways to lay the blame for poverty on the parents and children that suffer it, says Zoe Williams.

2. Ed Miliband is no leader. He is a vulture (Times)

The Syria vote crystallised his failings, says David Aaronovitch. He waits for mistakes, then like a scavenger exploits them.

3. Ed Miliband was good on Syria. But he'll soon be given a Kinnock-style kicking (Guardian)

The Tories are bruised, writes Martin Kettle. So prepare for the most sustained character assassination in British politics since the 90s.

4. At last, the blue-chip hackers are about to be exposed. But I still fear a whitewash (Daily Mail)

If the matter is soon buried by the authorities, we can only conclude that there is one law for large companies — and another for the press, writes Stephen Glover.

5. Though Labour has rolled back on interventionism, the doctrine still survives (Independent)

US and British foreign policy has undergone an adjustment, not a transformation, writes John Rentoul. 

6. Morsi was running a coup, not a democracy (Times)

Egypt’s deposed leader was the frontman for a totalitarian sect that ignored demands for social justice, says Michael Burleigh. 

7. The questions that have to be answered about our bloated BBC (Daily Telegraph)

Lavish pay-offs and a City bonus culture have tainted a corporation that belongs to us all, writes Peter Oborne. 

8. UK economy calls for cautious optimism (Financial Times)

Several years of very easy monetary policy might at last be having an effect, writes Gavyn Davies.

9. Labour is broke and has no back-up plan (Daily Telegraph)

With ties to the unions and their funds severed, Miliband needs to find a new source of income, says Dan Hodges.

10. How social media delivered the Syria defeat (Daily Telegraph)

Politicians will have to work harder to justify their policies now that voters can tweet MPs, says Sue Cameron. 

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.
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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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