Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Tory benefit proposals are stupid and cruel (Observer)

Barbara Ellen: The plan to make the unemployed work for their benefits is breathtakingly wrong

2. The bank wot won it? (Sunday Times)

Not until investment picks up can the Bank of England’s newfound optimism be justified, writes David Smith

3. David Cameron has a women problem (Independent)

Poll after poll shows they are deserting the Tories, and when interviewed by Red magazine, the PM managed to shoot himself in the foot, says Janet Street-Porter

4. Open government? Don't make me laugh (Observer)

David Cameron is boasting about the UK's transparent government. In fact there is more darkness than daylight, says Nick Cohen

5. Don’t bully the energy giants — here’s how to help the little guys (Sunday Times)

While my head knows that Ed Miliband’s idea of freezing energy bills could leave us with frozen homes, my heart can’t suppress a cheer at the thought of exacting some petty revenge, writes Camilla Cavendish

6. Christians are dying for us to help (Sunday Telegraph)

The West has been apathetic in its response to the persecution of Christians by Islamic extremists. But such apathy can have disastrous consequences, says Jenny McCartney

7. Porn has changed – for the worse. Even men have noticed (Independent)

The former editor of a lads' mag has changed his view of pornography, because of the possible effect on his son, but he has forgotten something, says Joan Smith

8. This joyous performance will do more for fashion's health than Femen stunts (Observer)
Rick Owens's designs for a team of athletes achieved far more during Paris fashion week than Femen's topless protest, says Bertie Brandes

9. David Cameron gears up to say hello again to Mondeo Man (Sunday Telegraph)
Far from lurching to the Right, the PM wants to reintroduce himself to the Tory voters who famously defected to Tony Blair, says Matthew d’Ancona

10. How Turkey blew its chance to lead this troubled region (Independent)

The country could have enhanced its influence and saved a lot of lives. It did the exact opposite, says Patrick Cockburn

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.
Getty
Show Hide image

How Theresa May laid a trap for herself on the immigration target

When Home Secretary, she insisted on keeping foreign students in the figures – causing a headache for herself today.

When Home Secretary, Theresa May insisted that foreign students should continue to be counted in the overall immigration figures. Some cabinet colleagues, including then Business Secretary Vince Cable and Chancellor George Osborne wanted to reverse this. It was economically illiterate. Current ministers, like the Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, Chancellor Philip Hammond and Home Secretary Amber Rudd, also want foreign students exempted from the total.

David Cameron’s government aimed to cut immigration figures – including overseas students in that aim meant trying to limit one of the UK’s crucial financial resources. They are worth £25bn to the UK economy, and their fees make up 14 per cent of total university income. And the impact is not just financial – welcoming foreign students is diplomatically and culturally key to Britain’s reputation and its relationship with the rest of the world too. Even more important now Brexit is on its way.

But they stayed in the figures – a situation that, along with counterproductive visa restrictions also introduced by May’s old department, put a lot of foreign students off studying here. For example, there has been a 44 per cent decrease in the number of Indian students coming to Britain to study in the last five years.

Now May’s stubbornness on the migration figures appears to have caught up with her. The Times has revealed that the Prime Minister is ready to “soften her longstanding opposition to taking foreign students out of immigration totals”. It reports that she will offer to change the way the numbers are calculated.

Why the u-turn? No 10 says the concession is to ensure the Higher and Research Bill, key university legislation, can pass due to a Lords amendment urging the government not to count students as “long-term migrants” for “public policy purposes”.

But it will also be a factor in May’s manifesto pledge (and continuation of Cameron’s promise) to cut immigration to the “tens of thousands”. Until today, ministers had been unclear about whether this would be in the manifesto.

Now her u-turn on student figures is being seized upon by opposition parties as “massaging” the migration figures to meet her target. An accusation for which May only has herself, and her steadfast politicising of immigration, to blame.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

0800 7318496