Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Tory benefit proposals are stupid and cruel (Observer)

Barbara Ellen: The plan to make the unemployed work for their benefits is breathtakingly wrong

2. The bank wot won it? (Sunday Times)

Not until investment picks up can the Bank of England’s newfound optimism be justified, writes David Smith

3. David Cameron has a women problem (Independent)

Poll after poll shows they are deserting the Tories, and when interviewed by Red magazine, the PM managed to shoot himself in the foot, says Janet Street-Porter

4. Open government? Don't make me laugh (Observer)

David Cameron is boasting about the UK's transparent government. In fact there is more darkness than daylight, says Nick Cohen

5. Don’t bully the energy giants — here’s how to help the little guys (Sunday Times)

While my head knows that Ed Miliband’s idea of freezing energy bills could leave us with frozen homes, my heart can’t suppress a cheer at the thought of exacting some petty revenge, writes Camilla Cavendish

6. Christians are dying for us to help (Sunday Telegraph)

The West has been apathetic in its response to the persecution of Christians by Islamic extremists. But such apathy can have disastrous consequences, says Jenny McCartney

7. Porn has changed – for the worse. Even men have noticed (Independent)

The former editor of a lads' mag has changed his view of pornography, because of the possible effect on his son, but he has forgotten something, says Joan Smith

8. This joyous performance will do more for fashion's health than Femen stunts (Observer)
Rick Owens's designs for a team of athletes achieved far more during Paris fashion week than Femen's topless protest, says Bertie Brandes

9. David Cameron gears up to say hello again to Mondeo Man (Sunday Telegraph)
Far from lurching to the Right, the PM wants to reintroduce himself to the Tory voters who famously defected to Tony Blair, says Matthew d’Ancona

10. How Turkey blew its chance to lead this troubled region (Independent)

The country could have enhanced its influence and saved a lot of lives. It did the exact opposite, says Patrick Cockburn

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.
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The NS Podcast #215: Election Special

The New Statesman podcast.

Join us for the New Statesman on-tour election special! As the polling day approaches, our team of politics writers regale Stephen Bush with news of their travels around the country. From Dover to Derby North, and from St Ives to Sheffield Hallam, via Birmingham, Belfast and Vauxhall - listen in for the interviews and insights near you.

 

Quotes of the Week:

Anoosh Chakelian on Nick Clegg in Sheffield Hallam: "Alot of people I spoke to were saying, 'Well, he went into coalition and he broke some promises, but he's been punished enough.'"

 

Caroline Crampton on Dover: "I found a lot of people who are not voting at all, or are voting for UKIP, or have voted for UKIP and are now going to vote Conservative."

 

Jonn Elledge on monkeying around in Hartlepool: "My understanding is that [the monkey mascot] never expected to win. I think he ran as a novelty candidate and then found himself mayor and ran Hartlepool for ten years."

You can subscribe to the podcast through iTunes here or with this RSS feed: http://rss.acast.com/newstatesman, or listen using the player below.

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Visit newstatesman.com/podcast for more details and how to contact us.

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