Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Osborne has been disproved on austerity (Financial Times)

Nobody thought a recovery would never happen – merely that it would be delayed, says Martin Wolf.

2. Ed Miliband is no more 'red' than the Tony Blair that won the 1997 general election (Independent)

The Labour leader’s temporary freeze on energy bills is a fair and moderate step, says Andrew Adonis.

3. The scale of Ed’s ambition is both breathtaking and terrifying (Daily Telegraph)

The Labour leader’s socialist ideas on energy prices and housing shortages are radical, coherent and – worst of all – popular, says Fraser Nelson. 

4. David Cameron's least favourite question: whose side are you on? (Guardian)

There is no vacancy in the fabled centre ground, writes Polly Toynbee. Labour occupies it, and voters may no longer be fooled by red scaremongering.

5. Good news – foreigners are buying up Britain (Daily Telegraph)

The present phase of globalisation is painful for the west, but we should see it through, writes Jeremy Warner.

6. Ed can win from here. But he can’t govern (Times)

At last Miliband has defined what he stands for — it is not challenging his party’s comfort zone, says Philip Collins.

7. Only talks can reset Iran’s atomic clock (Financial Times)

The US must take risks or accept a stand-off, with Iran trundling further towards the bomb, writes Philip Stephens.

8. Beyond Europe (Times)

Senior Tories need to talk more about bread and butter issues like housing and pay, says a Times editorial.

9. 'Mental patient' fancy dress shows how deep offensive stereotypes go in society (Guardian)

Tesco and Asda have done the decent thing, says Alastair Campbell. But we must work to end the stigma about mental health in work, communities, friends – even the NHS.

Where are the  Islamic voices raised in protest at the abuse of the system, asks Peter Popham. 

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.