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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.
The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Miliband has great strengths – but can he convince the voters in time? (Independent)

He may not look prime ministerial, but his background gives him more experience of power than Blair, Brown, Cameron, Osborne and Clegg had when they came to office, writes Steve Richards.

2. Germany: the Age of Merkel (Guardian)

Angela Merkel has not so much clung on to power in Germany, as she did in 2009, as hugely increased her grip on it, says a Guardian editorial.

3. The American dream has become a burden for most (Guardian)

As wages stagnate and costs rise, US workers recognise the guiding ideal of this nation for the delusional myth it is, writes Gary Younge.

4. What Labour must do to win power (Financial Times)

Policies must make sense for business, job creation and investment, says Peter Mandelson.

5. Into the Minotaur’s cave of diplomacy: how Russia became Syria’s deterrent (Independent)

The Syrians, who often memorise poetry, like Lavrov: they believe he writes it in his spare time, writes Robert Fisk.

6. At last, we see Ed in his true colours, waving the red flag (Daily Telegraph)

The Labour leader wants more socialism, an idea that has failed all over the world, writes Boris Johnson.

7. In my opinion politics needs columnists (Times)

It’s hard to divert the supertanker of voters’ views, but we scribblers can help to navigate the waters, writes Tim Montgomerie.

8. How Labour can win (Guardian)

Ed Miliband must bury his party's tribalism and forge links with union members and Lib Dems, says Chris Huhne.

9. Ed must clarify Labour’s muddled message (Times)

Supporters hope that this conference will provide the confidence they crave, writes Jenni Russell.

10. Congress is putting the dollar in peril (Financial Times)

Fresh evidence of US self-harm would hasten diversification to other currencies, writes Edward Luce.