Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Miliband has great strengths – but can he convince the voters in time? (Independent)

He may not look prime ministerial, but his background gives him more experience of power than Blair, Brown, Cameron, Osborne and Clegg had when they came to office, writes Steve Richards.

2. Germany: the Age of Merkel (Guardian)

Angela Merkel has not so much clung on to power in Germany, as she did in 2009, as hugely increased her grip on it, says a Guardian editorial.

3. The American dream has become a burden for most (Guardian)

As wages stagnate and costs rise, US workers recognise the guiding ideal of this nation for the delusional myth it is, writes Gary Younge.

4. What Labour must do to win power (Financial Times)

Policies must make sense for business, job creation and investment, says Peter Mandelson.

5. Into the Minotaur’s cave of diplomacy: how Russia became Syria’s deterrent (Independent)

The Syrians, who often memorise poetry, like Lavrov: they believe he writes it in his spare time, writes Robert Fisk.

6. At last, we see Ed in his true colours, waving the red flag (Daily Telegraph)

The Labour leader wants more socialism, an idea that has failed all over the world, writes Boris Johnson.

7. In my opinion politics needs columnists (Times)

It’s hard to divert the supertanker of voters’ views, but we scribblers can help to navigate the waters, writes Tim Montgomerie.

8. How Labour can win (Guardian)

Ed Miliband must bury his party's tribalism and forge links with union members and Lib Dems, says Chris Huhne.

9. Ed must clarify Labour’s muddled message (Times)

Supporters hope that this conference will provide the confidence they crave, writes Jenni Russell.

10. Congress is putting the dollar in peril (Financial Times)

Fresh evidence of US self-harm would hasten diversification to other currencies, writes Edward Luce.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.
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Fight: Arron Banks versus Mary Beard on the fall of Rome

On the one hand: one of Britain's most respected classicists. On the other: Nigel Farage's sugar daddy. 

Tom Lehrer once said that he would quit satire after Henry Kissinger – him of napalm strikes and the Nixon administration – received the Nobel Peace Prize.

Your mole is likewise minded to hand in hat, glasses and pen after the latest clash of the titans.

In the blue corner: Arron Banks, insurance millionaire and Nigel Farage’s sugar daddy.

In the red corner: Mary Beard, Professor of Classics, University of Cambridge, documentarian, author, historian of the ancient world.

It all started when Banks suggested that the fall of the Roman Empire was down to…you guessed it, immigration:

To which Beard responded:

Now, some might back down at this point. But not Banks, the only bank that never suffers from a loss of confidence.

Did Banks have another life as a classical scholar, perhaps? Twitter users were intrigued as to where he learnt so much about the ancient world. To which Banks revealed all:

I, Claudius is a novel. It was written in 1934, and concerns events approximately three centuries from the fall of Rome. But that wasn't the end of Banks' expertise:

Gladiator is a 2000 film. It is set 200 years before the fall of Rome.

Your mole rests. 

I'm a mole, innit.