Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The early years educational underclass is a handy moralisers' myth (Guardian)

Iain Duncan Smith's thinktank finds dubious ways to lay the blame for poverty on the parents and children that suffer it, says Zoe Williams.

2. Ed Miliband is no leader. He is a vulture (Times)

The Syria vote crystallised his failings, says David Aaronovitch. He waits for mistakes, then like a scavenger exploits them.

3. Ed Miliband was good on Syria. But he'll soon be given a Kinnock-style kicking (Guardian)

The Tories are bruised, writes Martin Kettle. So prepare for the most sustained character assassination in British politics since the 90s.

4. At last, the blue-chip hackers are about to be exposed. But I still fear a whitewash (Daily Mail)

If the matter is soon buried by the authorities, we can only conclude that there is one law for large companies — and another for the press, writes Stephen Glover.

5. Though Labour has rolled back on interventionism, the doctrine still survives (Independent)

US and British foreign policy has undergone an adjustment, not a transformation, writes John Rentoul. 

6. Morsi was running a coup, not a democracy (Times)

Egypt’s deposed leader was the frontman for a totalitarian sect that ignored demands for social justice, says Michael Burleigh. 

7. The questions that have to be answered about our bloated BBC (Daily Telegraph)

Lavish pay-offs and a City bonus culture have tainted a corporation that belongs to us all, writes Peter Oborne. 

8. UK economy calls for cautious optimism (Financial Times)

Several years of very easy monetary policy might at last be having an effect, writes Gavyn Davies.

9. Labour is broke and has no back-up plan (Daily Telegraph)

With ties to the unions and their funds severed, Miliband needs to find a new source of income, says Dan Hodges.

10. How social media delivered the Syria defeat (Daily Telegraph)

Politicians will have to work harder to justify their policies now that voters can tweet MPs, says Sue Cameron. 

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.
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Will the House of Lords block Brexit?

Process, and a desire to say "I told you so" will be the real battle lines. 

It’s the people versus the peers, at least as far as some overly-excited Brexiteers are concerned. The bill to trigger Article 50 starts its passage through the House of Lords today, and with it, a row about the unelected chamber and how it ought to behave as far as Brexit is concerned.

This week will, largely, be sound and fury. More peers have signed up to speak than since Tony Blair got rid of the bulk of hereditary peers, triggering a 200-peer long queue of parliamentarians there to rage against the dying of the light, before, inevitably, the Commons prevailed over the Lords.

And to be frank, the same is ultimately going to happen with Article 50. From former SDPers, now either Labour peers or Liberal Democrat peers, who risked their careers over Europe, to the last of the impeccably pro-European Conservatives, to committed Labour and Liberal politicians, there are a number of pro-Europeans who will want to make their voices heard before bowing to the inevitable. Others, too, will want to have their “I told you so” on record should it all go belly-up.

The real battle starts next week, when the bill enters committee stage, and it is then that peers will hope to extract concessions from the government, either through defeat in the Lords or the threat of defeat in the Lords. Opposition peers will aim to secure concessions on the process of the talks, rather than to frustrate the exit.

But there are some areas where the government may be forced to give way. The Lords will seek to codify the government’s promise of a vote on the deal and to enshrine greater parliamentary scrutiny of the process, which is hard to argue against, and the government may concede that quarterly statements to the House on the process of Brexit are a price worth paying, and will, in any case, be a concession they end up making further down the line anyway.

But the big prize is the rights of EU citizens already resident here.  The Lords has the advantage of having the overwhelming majority of the public – and the promises of every senior Leaver during the referendum campaign – behind them on that issue. When the unelected chamber faces down the elected, they like to have the weight of public opinion behind them so this is a well-chosen battleground.

But as Alex Barker explains in today’s FT, the rights of citizens aren’t as easy to guarantee as they look. Do pensions count? What about the children of EU citizens? What about access to social security and health? Rights that are easy to protect in the UK are more fraught in Spain, for instance. What about a British expat, working in, say, Italy, married to an Italian, who divorces, but wishes to remain in Italy afterwards? There is general agreement on all sides that the rights of Brits living in the rest of the EU and citizens of the EU27 living here need to be respected and guaranteed. But that even areas of broad agreement are the subject of fraught negotiation shows why those “I told you sos”  may come in handy sooner than we think.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.