The New Statesman’s rolling politics blog

RSS

Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.
The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. It’s Ed 'Ryanair’ Miliband v David 'Business Class' Cameron (Sunday Telegraph)

The Tories realise they are in trouble unless the public believes them to be in the same single class Boeing 737 as the rest of us, says Matthew d'Ancona.

2. Three daunting hurdles that the Labour Party needs to overcome (Observer)

Ed Miliband goes into conference facing huge challenges, writes Andrew Rawnsley. Some signature policies might help convince voters.

3. Zombies stir to drag Ed back to his dark side (Sunday Times)

McBride tells us more than we might like to know about where Miliband came from, writes Adam Boulton.

4. Ed really will be on the rocks if he slips up at the seaside... (Mail on Sunday)

Miliband’s team hope that a conference with a simple, direct policy message can steady the ship, says James Forsyth.
 
5. While Iran and the US talk of peace, the real war keeps going (Independent on Sunday)

Ethnic cleansing continues as President Rouhani prepares to address the UN on Tuesday, writes Patrick Cockburn.

6. Once, British statesmen were defined by their ambition (Mail on Sunday)

Clegg's proud conference boast of what the coalition hasn't done shows we are stuck in the politics of no, says Allister Heath.

7. To fight climate change, we must trust scientific truth and collective action (Observer)

Sceptics will rubbish a new report on climate change, dismissing calls for governmental action, writes Will Hutton. Don't be swayed.

8. Damian McBride knew: Get caught and you walk alone (Independent on Sunday)

It did not damage Gordon Brown's image that he seemed to practise gangland politics, writes John Rentoul.

9. 'Führerprinzip’ is killing off genuine debate (Sunday Telegraph)

The balance between state power and free markets needs to be constantly discussed, says Janet Daley.

10. American gun use is out of control. Shouldn't the world intervene? (Observer)

The death toll from firearms in the US suggests that the country is gripped by civil war, writes Henry Porter.