Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Miliband can build a new Labour majority (Times)

Claiming to lead a "One Nation Party", Miliband must pursue a 40 per cent strategy and build a new election-winning coalition, writes Marcus Roberts.

2. Political parties have been deserted, and no wonder (Daily Telegraph)

Today’s voters want a constant conversation, not set-piece occasions that pay them no heed, writes Charles Moore.

3. Luckily for Ed Miliband, Labour is not as ruthless as he is (Guardian)

Another good Labour conference speech may boost ratings, but it is the day-to-day combat that will decide who occupies No 10, says Jonathan Freedland.

4. We have the Germany we always wanted (Financial Times)

Mature politics and economic power are what make the country special, writes Tony Barber.

5. Damian McBride's book details past machinations, but its impact will reverberate through the present - and the future (Independent)

Brown’s main allies now lead the party, writes Steve Richards. The tension has not died.

6. Embrace the hollowing out of London (Financial Times)

We should build on the city’s status as a global playground, writes Ben Rogers.

7. Give us sunny Conservatism again, Dave (Times)

The PM must renew his otimistic message and defeat Clegg’s attempt to paint Tories as panto villains, says Matthew Parris.

8. Labour Party conference: the future not the past (Guardian)

Polls have begun to show the Conservatives level pegging, and the unions, the leader and policy all need to be addressed, says a Guardian editorial.

9. A president but not the supreme leader – and therein lies the problem for Hassan Rouhani (Independent)

The Iranians are spinning in the media so that the centrifuges can keep on spinning, says David Usborne.

10. What rubbish, Sir Simon! Our intelligence agencies are not outside the law (Guardian)

Real issues arise out of the Snowden affair, but British security laws keep us safe without intruding on citizens' freedoms, says Malcolm Rifkind.

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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.