Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Miliband can build a new Labour majority (Times)

Claiming to lead a "One Nation Party", Miliband must pursue a 40 per cent strategy and build a new election-winning coalition, writes Marcus Roberts.

2. Political parties have been deserted, and no wonder (Daily Telegraph)

Today’s voters want a constant conversation, not set-piece occasions that pay them no heed, writes Charles Moore.

3. Luckily for Ed Miliband, Labour is not as ruthless as he is (Guardian)

Another good Labour conference speech may boost ratings, but it is the day-to-day combat that will decide who occupies No 10, says Jonathan Freedland.

4. We have the Germany we always wanted (Financial Times)

Mature politics and economic power are what make the country special, writes Tony Barber.

5. Damian McBride's book details past machinations, but its impact will reverberate through the present - and the future (Independent)

Brown’s main allies now lead the party, writes Steve Richards. The tension has not died.

6. Embrace the hollowing out of London (Financial Times)

We should build on the city’s status as a global playground, writes Ben Rogers.

7. Give us sunny Conservatism again, Dave (Times)

The PM must renew his otimistic message and defeat Clegg’s attempt to paint Tories as panto villains, says Matthew Parris.

8. Labour Party conference: the future not the past (Guardian)

Polls have begun to show the Conservatives level pegging, and the unions, the leader and policy all need to be addressed, says a Guardian editorial.

9. A president but not the supreme leader – and therein lies the problem for Hassan Rouhani (Independent)

The Iranians are spinning in the media so that the centrifuges can keep on spinning, says David Usborne.

10. What rubbish, Sir Simon! Our intelligence agencies are not outside the law (Guardian)

Real issues arise out of the Snowden affair, but British security laws keep us safe without intruding on citizens' freedoms, says Malcolm Rifkind.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.