Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Miliband can build a new Labour majority (Times)

Claiming to lead a "One Nation Party", Miliband must pursue a 40 per cent strategy and build a new election-winning coalition, writes Marcus Roberts.

2. Political parties have been deserted, and no wonder (Daily Telegraph)

Today’s voters want a constant conversation, not set-piece occasions that pay them no heed, writes Charles Moore.

3. Luckily for Ed Miliband, Labour is not as ruthless as he is (Guardian)

Another good Labour conference speech may boost ratings, but it is the day-to-day combat that will decide who occupies No 10, says Jonathan Freedland.

4. We have the Germany we always wanted (Financial Times)

Mature politics and economic power are what make the country special, writes Tony Barber.

5. Damian McBride's book details past machinations, but its impact will reverberate through the present - and the future (Independent)

Brown’s main allies now lead the party, writes Steve Richards. The tension has not died.

6. Embrace the hollowing out of London (Financial Times)

We should build on the city’s status as a global playground, writes Ben Rogers.

7. Give us sunny Conservatism again, Dave (Times)

The PM must renew his otimistic message and defeat Clegg’s attempt to paint Tories as panto villains, says Matthew Parris.

8. Labour Party conference: the future not the past (Guardian)

Polls have begun to show the Conservatives level pegging, and the unions, the leader and policy all need to be addressed, says a Guardian editorial.

9. A president but not the supreme leader – and therein lies the problem for Hassan Rouhani (Independent)

The Iranians are spinning in the media so that the centrifuges can keep on spinning, says David Usborne.

10. What rubbish, Sir Simon! Our intelligence agencies are not outside the law (Guardian)

Real issues arise out of the Snowden affair, but British security laws keep us safe without intruding on citizens' freedoms, says Malcolm Rifkind.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.