Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Nick Clegg is becoming the heir to Blair (Times)

The Liberal Democrat leader is winning admirers by standing against the extremes of left and right, writes Rachel Sylvester.

2. Missiles alone cannot secure US credibility (Financial Times)

Obama has grasped the superior power of economic strength, says Gideon Rachman.

3. The long arm of Plebgate (Guardian)

The never-ending police inquiry into the treatment of Andrew Mitchell should be of concern to all democrats, says Chris Mullin.

4. Why the Mail stands shoulder to shoulder with the BBC... (Daily Mail)

The remedy being widely canvassed at Westminster is an assault on freedom of expression that should horrify all lovers of liberty, says a Daily Mail editorial.

5. Why the Lib Dems are doomed to be unpopular – and also powerful (Independent)

Clegg and his party still have cause for hope, but it has little to do with the polls, writes Steve Richards.

6. Full-face veils aren't barbaric – but our response can be (Guardian)

The veil is a perfectly proper subject for debate in a liberal democracy – so long as Muslim women are not excluded, says Maleiha Malik.

7. Vote on EU will not help Cameron’s critics (Financial Times)

The polls show a dwindling of the salience of the issue – it grips a minority and bores the rest, writes Janan Ganesh.

8. Iran and the Bomb (Times)

The west is right to seek a diplomatic solution with Tehran to defuse an emerging nuclear threat, argues a Times editorial.

9. iPhone 5S: has Apple given up on innovation? (Guardian)

Once a company renowned for breaking new ground, Apple is turning into a typical American corporation, writes Aditya Chakrabortty.

10. Who lets murderers out of jail to do it again? (Daily Telegraph)

The safety of the public is woefully neglected by our prison and probation services, writes Philip Johnston.

Carl Court/Getty
Show Hide image

To stop Jeremy Corbyn, I am giving my second preference to Andy Burnham

The big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Voting is now underway in the Labour leadership election. There can be no doubt that Jeremy Corbyn is the frontrunner, but the race isn't over yet.

I know from conversations across the country that many voters still haven't made up their mind.

Some are drawn to Jeremy's promises of a new Jerusalem and endless spending, but worried that these endless promises, with no credibility, will only serve to lose us the next general election.

Others are certain that a Jeremy victory is really a win for Cameron and Osborne, but don't know who is the best alternative to vote for.

I am supporting Liz Kendall and will give her my first preference. But polling data is brutally clear: the big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Andy can win. He can draw together support from across the party, motivated by his history of loyalty to the Labour movement, his passionate appeal for unity in fighting the Tories, and the findings of every poll of the general public in this campaign that he is best placed candidate to win the next general election.

Yvette, in contrast, would lose to Jeremy Corbyn and lose heavily. Evidence from data collected by all the campaigns – except (apparently) Yvette's own – shows this. All publicly available polling shows the same. If Andy drops out of the race, a large part of the broad coalition he attracts will vote for Jeremy. If Yvette is knocked out, her support firmly swings behind Andy.

We will all have our views about the different candidates, but the real choice for our country is between a Labour government and the ongoing rightwing agenda of the Tories.

I am in politics to make a real difference to the lives of my constituents. We are all in the Labour movement to get behind the beliefs that unite all in our party.

In the crucial choice we are making right now, I have no doubt that a vote for Jeremy would be the wrong choice – throwing away the next election, and with it hope for the next decade.

A vote for Yvette gets the same result – her defeat by Jeremy, and Jeremy's defeat to Cameron and Osborne.

In the crucial choice between Yvette and Andy, Andy will get my second preference so we can have the best hope of keeping the fight for our party alive, and the best hope for the future of our country too.

Tom Blenkinsop is the Labour MP for Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland