Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The Lib Dems left me disillusioned. Labour has made me hopeful again (Guardian)

After leaving the Liberal Democrats I did not think I would join another party, says Richard Grayson. But in fact I couldn't not join Labour.

2. Summers’ end leaves Yellen out in front (Financial Times)

Frontrunner has done everyone a favour by withdrawing, writes Edward Luce.

3. Why is Ofsted lashing out against primary schools? (Guardian)

Swingeing reports by the inspection body are forcing primaries into academy status and tarnishing its independent reputation, writes John Harris.

4. Germany’s election is vital to Europe (Financial Times)

If the SPD and Greens won outright, they would move faster than Merkel on crisis management, writes Wolfgang Münchau.

5. What Nick Clegg can learn from François Mitterrand (Guardian)

The party faithful should not be dismayed by their leader's unpopularity, says Chris Huhne. History shows the Lib Dems will bounce back.

6. The decline and fall of Barack Obama (Times)

A presidency that began with such high expectations is confirming America’s decline as a world power, says Tim Montgomerie.

7. What Nick Clegg can learn from François Mitterrand (Guardian)

The party faithful should not be dismayed by their leader's unpopularity, says Chris Huhne. History shows the Lib Dems will bounce back.

8. There is something deeply cynical about this chemical weapons ‘timetable’ (Independent)

Even if it succeeds, Syrians will be left to kill each other as before - only without sarin, writes Robert Fisk.

9. Labour's plan to eject squatters won't fix Britain's broken housing system (Independent)

It is the causes - not the symptoms - of the housing crisis that Labour needs to crush, says Owen Jones.

10. Condescending Lord Clegg, the invincible loser of British politics (Daily Telegraph)

Luckily, there’s every chance the Lib Dems will be out of office after the next election, says Boris Johnson.

 

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.
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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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