Morning call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Bobbing Obama leaves Putin holding the Syrian powder keg (Sunday Times) (£)

Obama achieved far more by the threat of force, than by using force, writes Andrew Sullivan.

2. The question that the Lib Dems are desperate not to answer (Observer)

The party is split in so many ways over whether it would prefer to govern with Labour or the Tories, writes Andrew Rawnsley.

3. Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have put Russia back on the top table (Independent on Sunday)

World View: Deal in Geneva shows the Kremlin’s influence is at its greatest for more than 20 years, writes Patrick Cockburn.

4. The Lib Dems know their future lies in power-sharing (Sunday Telegraph)

One of Nick Clegg’s greatest strengths is his ability to think strategically. Thanks to him, no one can now claim that coalition governments are a recipe for disaster, writes Matthew D'Ancona.

5. Yarl's Wood affair is a symptom, not the disease (Observer)

Increasing numbers of vulnerable people are being denied redress under our criminal justice system, writes Nick Cohen.

6. Miliband should stop, wait and let the coalition fail (FT) (£)

The Labour leader should keep his head down and his party united, according to Robert Ford.

7. Two-state illusion (IHT)

The idea of a state for Palestinians and one for Israelis is a fantasy that blinds us, writes Ian S Lustick.

8. Clegg looks doomed but the cavalry are coming (Sunday Times) (£)

If Clegg can stay standing, the polls indicate his party are due a recovery, writes Adam Boulton. 

9. My veil epiphany (Observer)

Just what was Birmingham Met thinking of when it tried to stop women wearing the niqab? asks Victoria Coren.

10. Tina Brown leaves journalism in her wake (FT) (£)

The media’s most irrepressible trend-surfer was the editor who was always bigger than her cover stories, by John Gapper.

Cock-a-doodle-doo: the ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.
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Theresa May is paying the price for mismanaging Boris Johnson

The Foreign Secretary's bruised ego may end up destroying Theresa May. 

And to think that Theresa May scheduled her big speech for this Friday to make sure that Conservative party conference wouldn’t be dominated by the matter of Brexit. Now, thanks to Boris Johnson, it won’t just be her conference, but Labour’s, which is overshadowed by Brexit in general and Tory in-fighting in particular. (One imagines that the Labour leadership will find a way to cope somehow.)

May is paying the price for mismanaging Johnson during her period of political hegemony after she became leader. After he was betrayed by Michael Gove and lacking any particular faction in the parliamentary party, she brought him back from the brink of political death by making him Foreign Secretary, but also used her strength and his weakness to shrink his empire.

The Foreign Office had its responsibility for negotiating Brexit hived off to the newly-created Department for Exiting the European Union (Dexeu) and for navigating post-Brexit trade deals to the Department of International Trade. Johnson was given control of one of the great offices of state, but with no responsibility at all for the greatest foreign policy challenge since the Second World War.

Adding to his discomfort, the new Foreign Secretary was regularly the subject of jokes from the Prime Minister and cabinet colleagues. May likened him to a dog that had to be put down. Philip Hammond quipped about him during his joke-fuelled 2017 Budget. All of which gave Johnson’s allies the impression that Johnson-hunting was a licensed sport as far as Downing Street was concerned. He was then shut out of the election campaign and has continued to be a marginalised figure even as the disappointing election result forced May to involve the wider cabinet in policymaking.

His sense of exclusion from the discussions around May’s Florence speech only added to his sense of isolation. May forgot that if you aren’t going to kill, don’t wound: now, thanks to her lost majority, she can’t afford to put any of the Brexiteers out in the cold, and Johnson is once again where he wants to be: centre-stage. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.