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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Under the disguise of fixing lobbying, this Bill will crush democratic protest (Independent)

There is no question that British democracy is at the mercy of wealthy and corporate interests, but the Lobbying Bill takes aim at our hard-won freedoms instead, writes Owen Jones.

2. Our Westminster elite isn't up to dealing with Syria's crisis (Guardian)

Britain may no longer have a political establishment that can credibly speak to the public about the gravest affairs of state, writes John Harris.

3. Obama risks more than his credibility (Financial Times)

The US president may be getting into a game he cannot control, writes Edward Luce.

4. What the bully boys of broadcasting today could learn from Frost (Daily Mail)

David's hallmark characteristic was his affability and niceness, writes Melanie Phillips. And it was this good-natured quality that encouraged people to drop their guard.

5. Once Washington made the Middle East tremble – now no one there takes it seriously (Independent)

Our present leaders are paying the price for the dishonesty of Bush and Blair, says Robert Fisk.

6. The delayed attack on Syria is good for Britain – and the PM (Daily Telegraph)

By postponing military action, MPs did the right thing – and paid tribute to David Cameron, says Boris Johnson. 

7. How to end the silly season (Guardian)

MPs can save us from the media monster eating itself – by cutting short their long holidays, says Helen Lewis.

8. Lessons for Greece from derelict Detroit (Financial Times)

The US city symbolises modern industrial decline, writes Wolfgang Münchau. There is no reason to think it could not happen elsewhere.

9. Our reputation is in your hands, Mr Miliband (Times)

As Barack Obama awaits Congress’s vote on Syria there is one man who could restore Britain’s status as a key ally, writes Malcolm Rifkind.

10. Calling in SNP’s best communicator is sign of panic in 'Yes’ camp (Daily Telegraph)

The separatists’ campaign is coming apart and Kevin Pringle is not a miracle worker, writes Alan Cochrane.