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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Friends and foes are wondering if Mr Miliband has lost the plot (Daily Telegraph)

If Labour persists with the nursery school politics, the party is heading for defeat at the polls, says Mary Riddell. 

2. What are the Conservatives trying to hide? (Times)

If their memberships collapse, parties lose touch with local communities, writes Paul Goodman. And that should worry all of us.

3. Labour should hammer home one simple message on the economy (Guardian)

To regain voter confidence on the economy the party must point out that the pain of austerity has not been worth it, says Robert Skidelsky.

4. Any other ‘statesman’ who negotiated peace like John Kerry would be treated as a thief (Independent)

Kerry isn’t on the Palestinians' side, says Robert Fisk. He’s going all out for ‘peace’ on Israeli  government terms.

5. Yes, Mr Bryant made a fool of himself. But has Labour now revealed its vote-winner? (Daily Mail)

 Labour has now concluded that economic nationalism is the path to power, writes Andrew Alexander.

6. Tell the truth: the NHS will soon be bust (Times)

There’s no end to medical advances and their astronomical costs, writes Gaby Hinsliff. The trouble is, we can’t possibly afford them.

7. Gibraltar and the Falklands deny the logic of history (Guardian)

These relics of empire pay hardly any UK tax – but when the neighbours cut up nasty, they demand the British protect them, writes Simon Jenkins.

8. A 21st-century Nasser could give the Arab world its voice (Guardian)

Egypt's coup makers are phoney nationalists, writes Seumas Milne. But the goal of independence and social justice unites people across the region.

9. Carney is yet to bend markets to his will (Financial Times)

There are limits to what a central bank can credibly promise, writes Martin Sandbu.

10. Homeowners are not so bubbly this time (Daily Telegraph)

A jump in house prices used to be cause for celebration, writes Richard Dyson. So why are homeowners wary about the latest increase?