Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Our obesity crisis won't be solved by 'fitspiration' (Guardian)

Of course it's better to be fit than too thin, but any fixating on an unattainable body image doesn't help self-loathing women, writes Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett.

2. If anyone can find a viable plan for newspapers, Jeff Bezos can (Independent)

Anyone who loves and values newspapers should rejoice at this turn of events, argues Matthew Norman.

3. Stay-at-home mothers need our support (Telegraph)

George Osborne's patronising pronouncement will come as news to full-time mothers across the country, says Rowan Pelling.

4. The hideous hypocrisy of the charity fat cats (Daily Mail)

For the chiefs of some of the best-known charities, who insist they must take your money to tackle global poverty, stand accused of hypocrisy over their own pay, writes Ian Birrell.

5. Zero-hours contracts: in Cameron's Britain, the dockers' line-up is back (Guardian)

Driven by privatisation and corporate muscle, zero-hours casualisation is disastrous for workers, jobs and real recovery, says Seumas Milne.

6. Why Labour should fear Dave’s Wizard of Oz (Times) (£)

Lynton Crosby, Cameron’s election guru, has a simple and effective talent — telling politicians when to shut up, writes Anne McElvoy.

7. The global economy is now distinctly Victorian (FT) (£)

The Old Normal is looming large on our horizons, bringing with it unfettered markets, writes Adam Posen.

8. Why we’re all banking on the new Governor of the Bank of England (Telegraph)

Mark Carney’s message will play a crucial role in fanning the flames of economic recovery, says Andrew Haldenby.

9. Gibraltar: This Rock stands in the way of our national interest (Independent)

There is a case for summoning up our old colonial instincts to resolve this dispute, writes Mary Dejevsky.

10. Even now, we still don’t understand the riots (Times) (£)

Was this moral breakdown on a local scale or a national one? Is Britain broken? We need to know – but we don’t, says Daniel Finkelstein.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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