Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Labour must fight this war, not the last one (Daily Telegraph)

Syria’s children have a dream, too – it’s worth fighting for to make the world a better place, writes Mary Riddell. 

2. Does President Obama know he’s fighting on al-Qa’ida’s side? (Independent)

‘All for one and one for all’ should be the battle cry if the west goes to war against Assad’s Syrian regime, says Robert Fisk. 

3What happens in Syria will not stay in Syria (Times)

If Assad is allowed to cross Obama’s red line without consequence, America is giving a green light to other evils, says Daniel Finkelstein. 

4. An attack on Syria will only spread the war and killing (Guardian)

Instead of removing the chemical weapon threat, another western assault on the Arab world risks escalation and backlash, says Seumas Milne. 

5. This is a moment for democratic nations to live up to their values (Daily Telegraph)

The use of chemical weapons by President Assad's regime in Syria is a moral outrage that cannot go unchallenged, argues William Hague. 

6. Republicans weigh up the death of Obamacare (Times)

The President’s healthcare policy is hugely unpopular but it would be risky to repeal it, writes Justin Webb.

7. It’s not HS2 that’s going to boost the north’s economy (Independent)

Building this line would be just another way of reinforcing London’s pre-eminence, writes John Rentoul.

8. This war monger is the very last man we should listen to (Daily Mail

Tony Blair has not learnt any lessons from the tragic mistake of Iraq, writes Stephen Glover. Let’s hope, at this eleventh hour, that David Cameron finally will.

9. A year on from the Paralympics, people with disabilities still face prejudice and abuse (Guardian)

Attitudes to disability are so deep-rooted that the euphoria over the 2012 heroes could not spark a sea change, writes Ian Birrell.

10. To pivot to Asia we must learn the lingo (Financial Times)

States with centrally set curriculums can quickly change their language profile, writes Irvin Studin.

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The Deep Dive podcast: Mandates and Manifestos

The New Statesman's Deep Dive podcast.

Ian Leslie and Stewart Wood return for another episode of the Deep Dive. This time they're plunging into the murky world of election promises with Catherine Haddon, resident historian at the Institute of Government. Together they explore what an electoral mandate means, what a manifesto is for, and why we can't sue the government when they fail to keep their promises.

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