Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. A Lab-Lib deal in 2015 may be Ed Miliband's only chance of government (Guardian)

If Labour is serious about being open to coalition in 2015, the party must ditch its autocratic way of doing things now, writes Martin Kettle.

2. Stop the plotting, Mr Cameron, and rediscover your will to win (Daily Telegraph)

The Tories should be working on bold policies, not planning for another coalition, says Iain Martin.

3. Don’t blindly trust guardians of security (Financial Times)

Before the leaks, we had little insight into the scale of the NSA’s access to information, writes John Gapper.

4. Why I’m torn between freedom and security (Times)

Was the detention of David Miranda an assault on the press or a necessary protection? It’s impossible to decide, says Matt Ridley.

5. Caught in the crossfire of an ever dirtier war (Daily Mail)

The harrowing images of hundreds of dead Syrian children and adults will test the diplomatic patience of the west to the limit, writes Michael Burleigh. 

6. An uneasy election that is Angela Merkel’s to lose (Independent)

The visit of the Chancellor to Dachau says a lot about her political strategy, writes Mary Dejevsky. 

7. Innovation needs help of an active state (Financial Times)

Productive public spending leads to growth, as illustrated by the US, writes Mariana Mazzucato.

8. Fracking faces a little local difficulty (Daily Telegraph)

A measly 1 per cent of the spoils is not enough to convince residents to put up with fracking, writes Isabel Hardman. 

9. This was a coup: we must support Egypt's people, not its generals (Guardian)

The west must not risk losing legitimacy across the Middle East, says Douglas Alexander. It has to be clear in backing democracy, and defy al-Qaida's hate.

10. The young need help, not condemnation (Independent)

Does Nick Hurd even know what ‘grit’ is, asks Jane Merrick. The situation ‘Neets’ are in is not their fault.

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The UK is dangerously close to breaking apart - there's one way to fix it

We must rethink our whole constitutional settlement. 

When the then-Labour leader John Smith set up a report on social justice for what would be the incoming government in 1997, he said we must stop wasting our most precious resource – "the extraordinary skills and talents of ordinary people".

It is one of our party’s greatest tragedies that he never had the chance to see that vision put into practice. 

At the time, it was clear that while our values of equality, solidarity and tolerance endured, the solutions we needed were not the same as those when Labour was last in power in the 1970s, and neither were they to be found in the policies of opposition from the 1980s. 

The Commission on Social Justice described a UK transformed by three revolutions:

  • an economic revolution brought about by increasing globalisation, innovation and a changing labour market
  • a social revolution that had seen the role of women in society transformed, the traditional family model change, inequality ingrained and relationships between people in our communities strained
  • a political revolution that challenged the centralisation of power, demanded more individual control and accepted a different role for government in society.

Two decades on, these three revolutions could equally be applied to the UK, and Scotland, today. 

Our economy, society and our politics have been transformed even further, but there is absolutely no consensus – no agreement – about the direction our country should take. 

What that has led to, in my view, is a society more dangerously divided than at any point in our recent history. 

The public reject the status quo but there is no settled will about the direction we should take. 

And instead of grappling with the complex messages that people are sending us, and trying to find the solutions in the shades of grey, politicians of all parties are attached to solutions that are black or white, dividing us further. 

Anyone in Labour, or any party, who claims that we can sit on the margins and wait for politics to “settle down” will rightly be consigned to history. 

The future shape of the UK, how we govern ourselves and how our economy and society should develop, is now the single biggest political question we face. 

Politics driven by nationalism and identity, which were for so long mostly confined to Scotland, have now taken their place firmly in the mainstream of all UK politics. 

Continuing to pull our country in these directions risks breaking the United Kingdom once and for all. 

I believe we need to reaffirm our belief in the UK for the 21st century. 

Over time, political power has become concentrated in too few hands. Power and wealth hoarded in one corner of our United Kingdom has not worked for the vast majority of people. 

That is why the time has come for the rest of the UK to follow where Scotland led in the 1980s and 1990s and establish a People’s Constitutional Convention to re-establish the UK for a new age. 

The convention should bring together groups to deliberate on the future of our country and propose a way forward that strengthens the UK and establishes a new political settlement for the whole of our country. 

After more than 300 years, it is time for a new Act of Union to safeguard our family of nations for generations to come.

This would mean a radical reshaping of our country along federal lines where every component part of the United Kingdom – Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and the English regions – take more responsibility for what happens in their own communities, but where we still maintain the protection of being part of a greater whole as the UK. 

The United Kingdom provides the redistribution of wealth that defines our entire Labour movement, and it provides the protection for public finance in Scotland that comes from being part of something larger, something good, and something worth fighting for. 

Kezia Dugdale is the leader of the Scottish Labour party.