Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. David Miranda, schedule 7 and the danger that all reporters now face (Guardian)

As the events in a Heathrow transit lounge – and the Guardian offices – have shown, the threat to journalism is real and growing, writes Alan Rusbridger.

2. Prepare to add HS2 and Universal Credit to our depressing list of fiascos (Daily Telegraph)

From the poll tax to HS2, ministers seem incapable of calling a halt to a failing policy, writes Philip Johnston.

3. How to cure Europe’s left (Financial Times)

Social democrats need to promote reform of their own favoured institutions, says Anthony Painter.

4. Why we all love Charlie Bucket (and despise the poor in real life) (Guardian)

We love the poor in fairytales, but survey after survey shows we are all too quick to blame real people who fall on hard times, writes Polly Toynbee. 

5. How will politicians vote? (Times)

Political parties must be transparent about their strategy for any hung Parliament, says a Times editorial.

6. Stability is what Egypt needs now (Financial Times)

If clean government, order and economic growth return then there is a chance for democracy, writes Gideon Rachman.

7. What is behind this fracking mania? Unbridled machismo (Guardian)

The prime minister's love of shale gas is not driven by jobs or energy security, but a fixation with manly extractive industries, writes George Monbiot.

8. Help to Buy is a dangerous political placebo... (Independent)

...but rising house prices are among the economic figures making Labour feel sick, writes Dominic Lawson.

9. In Cameron's casualised Britain, zero-hours contracts create a climate of fear (Guardian)

These contracts are symptomatic of job insecurity and falling living standards, writes Chuka Umunna. But Labour can offer a fairer way of working.

10. Section 28 hurt the Tories more than young gay people (Independent)

During the 15 years in which Section 28 was law, no local authority was prosecuted, writes Andy McSmith.

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Exclusive: Labour MEPs call for Jeremy Corbyn to resign as leader

Letter demands Corbyn's departure and attacks his office for "promoting" the work of the Leave campaign. 

Labour's MEPs have called for Jeremy Corbyn to resign in the latest challenge to his leadership. In a letter sent to Corbyn and leaked to the New Statesman, Glenis Willmott, the chair of the European Parliamentary Labour Party (EPLP), wrote: "We find it hard to see how any Labour leader can continue in that role if they do not have the support of their MPs." Corbyn yesterday lost a no confidence vote among the Parliamentary Labour Party by 176 to 40. The letter also attacked the leader's office for an "official Labour briefing document" which "promoted the work of Kate Hoey and Gisela Stuart for the Leave campaign."

The demand for Corbyn's resignation is described by sources as the "majority position" of Labour's 20 MEPs. Their stance could prove crucial if the leader is not automatically included in any new contest (a matter of legal dispute) and is required to seek 50 nominations from MP/MEPs (20 per cent of the total). 

The letter reads: 

"The European Parliamentary Labour Party met today for its first meeting since the referendum and concluded that we should send you this letter today.

"The EPLP has always striven to have a loyal and constructive relationship with our party leader, and we have worked hard to cooperate with you over recent months. However, we have very serious concerns in the light of Labour's defeat in the referendum campaign.

"Responsiblity for the UK leaving the EU lies with David Cameron. That being said, we were simply astounded that on Friday morning, as news of the result sank in, an official Labour briefing document promoted the work of Kate Hoey and Gisela Stuart for the Leave campaign.

"Labour's loyal and dedicated teams of activists had just spent weeks on the doorstep and on street-stalls making the case to remain in the EU and countering leave campaign arguments. Yet you and your office authorised a briefing that put the whole Labour campaign on a par with two Labour politicians who had been appearing for weeks alongside right-wing politicians, such as Nigel Farage and Boris Johnson.

"Separate from the referendum issue, it has become clear in recent days that you do not have the confidence of the Parliamentary Labour Party. We find it hard to see how many Labour leader can continue in that role if they do not have the support of their MPs.

"So it it with a heavy heart that we urge you, for the sake of the Labour Party and for the people in our country who need a Labour government, to reconsider your position as Labour leader."

Yours sincerely,

Glenis Wilmott MEP

On behalf of the European Parliamentary Labour Party 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.