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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. David Miranda, schedule 7 and the danger that all reporters now face (Guardian)

As the events in a Heathrow transit lounge – and the Guardian offices – have shown, the threat to journalism is real and growing, writes Alan Rusbridger.

2. Prepare to add HS2 and Universal Credit to our depressing list of fiascos (Daily Telegraph)

From the poll tax to HS2, ministers seem incapable of calling a halt to a failing policy, writes Philip Johnston.

3. How to cure Europe’s left (Financial Times)

Social democrats need to promote reform of their own favoured institutions, says Anthony Painter.

4. Why we all love Charlie Bucket (and despise the poor in real life) (Guardian)

We love the poor in fairytales, but survey after survey shows we are all too quick to blame real people who fall on hard times, writes Polly Toynbee. 

5. How will politicians vote? (Times)

Political parties must be transparent about their strategy for any hung Parliament, says a Times editorial.

6. Stability is what Egypt needs now (Financial Times)

If clean government, order and economic growth return then there is a chance for democracy, writes Gideon Rachman.

7. What is behind this fracking mania? Unbridled machismo (Guardian)

The prime minister's love of shale gas is not driven by jobs or energy security, but a fixation with manly extractive industries, writes George Monbiot.

8. Help to Buy is a dangerous political placebo... (Independent)

...but rising house prices are among the economic figures making Labour feel sick, writes Dominic Lawson.

9. In Cameron's casualised Britain, zero-hours contracts create a climate of fear (Guardian)

These contracts are symptomatic of job insecurity and falling living standards, writes Chuka Umunna. But Labour can offer a fairer way of working.

10. Section 28 hurt the Tories more than young gay people (Independent)

During the 15 years in which Section 28 was law, no local authority was prosecuted, writes Andy McSmith.

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