Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The decline of interest in politics is worse news for Labour (Guardian)

Behind the fun fisticuffs between Labour and the unions is a grim trend that threatens all politics, writes Geoffrey Wheatcroft.

2. Australia will reveal what politicians we want (Times)

Voters Down Under will show our MPs whether people want directionless crowd-pleasers or leaders with conviction, writes Tim Montgomerie.

3. The west's influence in Egypt is as limited as its will for democracy there (Guardian)

If the country is to avoid a return to entrenched dictatorship, secular progressives and Islamists must find common cause, writes Jonathan Steele. 

4. Last US frontier shows need for government (Financial Times)

Thanks to local and state spending, funding of public goods is in better shape than many realise, writes Martin Dickson.

5. This government attack on unions will gag charities and campaign groups, too (Guardian)

Even local campaigns against fracking or a new road may be criminalised under draconian proposals to limit political spending, says Frances O'Grady.

6. This might not be a recovery, but a good old-fashioned boom (Daily Telegraph)

It’s no time for caution – we’re learning to have fun again, so let’s enjoy it while we can, says George Trefgarne.

7. It’s time for a new Labour guru – Coco Chanel (Daily Telegraph)

The only route to power for Ed Miliband is to adopt a very simple maxim: less is more, says Dan Hodges.

8. If the PM doesn't hit the brakes, his legacy will be one of the biggest white elephants in history (Daily Mail)

More and more evidence is stacking up to suggest that HS2, if it goes ahead, will be one of the greatest follies of any British government, writes Stephen Glover. 

9. When did university become a factory? (Independent)

What has happened to the places of free thought and experimentation, where minds expanded, asks Yasmin Alibhai Brown.

10. Push too hard and we lose our faith in charity (Times)

People are becoming alienated by overpaid chiefs, overzealous interference and overemphasis on political lobbying, writes Libby Purves.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.