Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The US supreme court thinks racism is dead. It isn't (Guardian)

Judges gutted an act to protect black voters, saying it was out of date – but there are salient illustrations of their folly, writes Gary Younge. 

2. Miliband is taking his cue from loser Kinnock, not winner Blair (Daily Telegraph)

The Labour leader is doomed to fail because he offers nothing that raises a nation’s hopes, writes Boris Johnson.

3. What's killing Labour? A thousand failures to oppose the cuts (Independent)

The party has not so much missed open goals as fled in the opposite direction, says Owen Jones.

4. By the time HS2 arrives, we’ll no longer need it (Times)

The march of communications means we are gambling £40bn on a project that by 2032 will seem prehistoric, writes Tim Montgomerie.

5. The EU vote: this is a blue referendum (Guardian)

Cameron's meddling will deny us all the chance to vote on the European Union, in spite of cross-party support, says John Mills.

6. The Governor will need the Goldilocks touch (Times)

Carney must harness the goodwill on all sides to keep the economy at the right temperature, says John Redwood.

7. Labour and the unions: battle of Falkirk (Guardian)

Candidate selection can be a fraught business in all parties, even when the process is impeccably democratic, notes a Guardian editorial.

8. Press must withdraw from panto stitch-up (Sun)

What seemed like the chance of a lifetime has turned into a blight on Leveson's seemingly unstoppable climb to the pinnacle of his profession, writes Trevor Kavanagh. 

9. Britain’s problems with a veto on Syria go right back to Yalta (Independent)

It was then that the 'big five' were granted such power, writes Robert Fisk.

10. Obama’s Africa trip is too little, too late (Financial Times)

China-Africa trade is now twice the level of US-Africa trade, writes Edward Luce.

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Italian PM Matteo Renzi resigns after referendum No vote

Europe's right-wing populists cheered the result. 

Italy's centrist Prime Minister Matteo Renzi was forced to resign late on Sunday after he lost a referendum on constitutional change.

With most ballots counted, 60 per cent of Italians voted No to change, according to the BBC. The turn out was nearly 70 per cent. 

Voters were asked whether they backed a reform to Italy's complex political system, but right-wing populists have interpreted the referendum as a wider poll on the direction of the country.

Before the result, former Ukip leader Nigel Farage tweeted: "Hope the exit polls in Italy are right. This vote looks to me to be more about the Euro than constitutional change."

The leader of France's far-right Front National, Marine Le Pen, tweeted "bravo" to her Eurosceptic "friend" Matteo Salvini, a politician who campaigned for the No vote. She described the referendum result as a "thirst for liberty". 

In his resignation speech, Renzi told reporters he took responsibility for the outcome and added "good luck to us all". 

Since gaining office in 2014, Renzi has been a reformist politician. He introduced same-sex civil unions, made employment laws more flexible and abolished small taxes, and was known by some as "Europe's last Blairite".

However, his proposed constitutional reforms divided opinion even among liberals, because of the way they removed certain checks and balances and handed increased power to the government.

 

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.