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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Britain is betraying its values in its response to the Egyptian coup (Daily Telegraph)

William Hague can't tell the truth about Morsi's departure for fear of upsetting the US, writes Peter Oborne.

2. Voters are disdainful of politics and will not pay for state funding of parties (Independent)

Last week it was Ed at bay in PMQs, now it’s Cameron, writes Steve Richards. Both leaders are vulnerable over party funding.

3. Miliband is emerging as the true heir to Blair (Daily Telegraph)

By moving to loosen Labour's links to the unions, the leader is gambling everything, says John McTernan.

4. Why women part-timers should be full-time ball-breakers (Guardian)

Sexism probably explains the low status of working mothers, writes Zoe Williams. But it's also their reluctance to assert what a blessing their hours are.

5. Political Islam faces its sternest test (Financial Times)

There is no evidence that Arabs believe Wahhabism is the future, says David Gardner.

6. Wisdom or piffle, we've a right to see what 'Disgusted of Highgrove' writes to ministers (Daily Mail)

The public has an interest in knowing how, and where, Prince Charles has tried to exercise influence, says Stephen Glover.

7. There’s no cure to the health spending paradox (Times)

At the same time as it gets cheaper to do IVF or cataracts, our constant innovations will inevitably push up budgets, writes Matt Ridley.

8. Can Ed Miliband give England a political voice at last? (Guardian)

The English identity is much more complex and progressive than the saloon-bar Farageism it is too often depicted as, writes Martin Kettle.

9. I want to be greener. But does the government? (Independent)

When it came into office in 2010, the "greenest government ever" promised to boost the use of low and zero emission vehicles, writes Jane Merrick. But take up is a painfully slow crawl.

10. Welcome to the geopolitics of trade, where Dr Pangloss meets Machiavelli (Guardian)

For the sake of Britain's own unemployed, we need a new transatlantic trade deal, writes Timothy Garton Ash. But not so we can also gang up on China.