Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Looking for a party funding scandal? Try David Cameron's Conservatives (Guardian)

We know how much Unite gives Labour, but finding out who writes the cheques for Conservative Central Office is more difficult, writes Aditya Chakrabortty.

2. The question Ed Miliband has to answer: whose side are you on? (Daily Telegraph)

Like Blair before him, the Labour leader must show he’s in favour of choice and standards, says Benedict Brogan.

3. Yes, Labour's selection process has been abused, but not by the unions (Guardian)

 It is time the spotlight was turned on the right wing of the party, who have used parliamentary seats as patronage for too long, says Len McCluskey.

4. Freedom and democracy can become enemies (Financial Times)

Key members of Egypt’s liberal movement supported the ouster of the country’s first democratically elected president, writes Gideon Rachman.

5. Labour needs the unions, but both need members (Guardian)

Falkirk is a tragedy for unionism, which suffers the same affliction as political parties do: empty democracy, writes Polly Toynbee.

6. The barons are dead. Long live the rank and file! (Times)

Ed Miliband’s plan to pass power from union leaders to individual members would be a bold and welcome step, writes Rachel Sylvester.

7. Lots of Conservative Party members prefer Ukip's policies (Daily Telegraph)

A study into who might change allegiance - and why - makes uncomfortable reading for the PM, say Tim Bale and Paul Webb. 

8. Yes, people in large homes should pay more tax (Times)

People who grew rich from property rises should help those who didn’t, says James Bloodworth.

9. The mess with Labour and the unions makes this the perfect time to let the state fund political parties (Independent)

If the lack of respect for MPs is what prevents taxpayers stumping up, this lack owes a lot to the present system, says Donald Macintyre.

10. Miliband must renounce more than Unite’s tactics (Financial Times)

The Labour leader’s task is to show voters that he would not govern how Len McCluskey desires, says Janan Ganesh.

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David Cameron calls Sadiq Khan a “proud Muslim” – after trying to link him to Islamic extremism

The PM has his best flipflops on.

After months of backing the nasty racial politics of the Tory mayoral campaign, the Prime Minister has taken the bold move of sharing a platform with infamous moderate Sadiq Khan on the EU Remain campaign trail. Quite a spectacular about-turn.

Compare and contrast, readers.

David Cameron, 20 April 2016

“If we are going to condemn not just violent extremism, but also the extremism that seeks to justify violence in any way, it is very important that we do not back these people, and we do not appear on platforms with them. And I have to say, I am concerned about Labour’s candidate for Mayor of London, who has appeared again and again and again . . . The Honourable Member for Tooting has appeared on a platform with him [imam Suliman Gani] nine times. This man supports IS.”

David Cameron, 30 May 2016

“Let me first of all congratulate Sadiq on his victory. He talked about his father. He’s the son of a bus driver. I’m the son of a stockbroker, which is not quite so romantic. But he makes an important point about our country. In one generation someone who’s a proud Muslim, a proud Brit and a proud Londoner can become mayor of the greatest city on Earth. That says something about our country. There are still glass ceilings we have got to smash. There’s still discrimination we have got to fight.”

What a difference a month makes, eh?

I'm a mole, innit.