Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Falkirk has revealed the rotten state of all our political parties (Guardian)

Falling membership has allowed small cliques to control our politics, writes John Harris. It's a failed model, but the powerful like it that way.

2. This attack on Labour’s union links must not succeed (Independent)

These union-bashers are beholden to private interests, and want Labour to be, too, says Owen Jones.

3. Abu Qatada’s case shows the human rights system works (Times)

Could you bear your country sending a man to a torture chamber, asks Adam Wagner. 

4. Weary US consumer shoulders a big load (Financial Times)

With China slowing, Europe still stuck and Japan in doubt, America has a heroic task, says Edward Luce.

5. Andy Murray: a victory which is his alone (Guardian)

He referred to himself as a British champion while Alex Salmond rather unnecessarily waved the saltire from the royal box, notes a Guardian editorial.

6. Who wants a PM who has no fight in him? (Times)

In dealing with unions Ed Miliband settled for a quiet life, writes Tim Montgomerie. But voters won’t stand for high taxes and a bloated state.

7. We British go out of our way to avoid using the word ‘Muslim’ (Independent)

If reporters avoid using the word, we also risk missing out on the positive side of religious identity, says Robert Fisk. 

8. As Britain dithers, the rest of the world is getting things done (Daily Telegraph)

Our great projects are being stalled by endless consultations and grinding bureaucracy, writes Boris Johnson.

9. What makes a 'real African'? (Guardian)

Too often the continent's writers are quizzed about their identity rather than the world they create, says Maaza Mengiste. 

10. Help business by taxing  profits abroad (Financial Times)

The US should eliminate the distinction between foreign corporate profits, writes Lawrence Summers.

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Donald Trump tweets he is “saddened” – but not about the earthquake in Mexico

Barack Obama and Jeremy Corbyn sent messages of sympathy to Mexico. 

A devastating earthquake in Mexico has killed at least 217 people, with rescue efforts still going on. School children are among the dead.

Around the world, politicians have been quick to offer their sympathy, not least Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, whose wife hails from Mexico. He tweeted: "My thoughts are with all those affected by today's earthquake in Mexico. Pensando en todos los afectados por el terremoto en México hoy" in the early hours of the morning, UK time.

Barack Obama may no longer be an elected politician, but he too offered a heartfelt message to those suffering, and like Corbyn, he wrote some of it in Spanish. "Thinking about our neighbors in Mexico and all our Mexican-American friends tonight. Cuidense mucho y un fuerte abrazo para todos," he tweeted. 

But what about the man now installed in the White House, Donald Trump? The Wall Builder-in-Chief was not idle on Tuesday night - in fact, he shared a message to the world via Twitter an hour after Obama. He too was "saddened" by what he had heard on Tuesday evening, news that he dubbed "the worst ever".

Yes, that's right. The Emmys viewing figures.

"I was saddened to see how bad the ratings were on the Emmys last night - the worst ever," he tweeted. "Smartest people of them all are the "DEPLORABLES."

No doubt Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto will get round to offering the United States his commiserations soon. 

I'm a mole, innit.