Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Falkirk has revealed the rotten state of all our political parties (Guardian)

Falling membership has allowed small cliques to control our politics, writes John Harris. It's a failed model, but the powerful like it that way.

2. This attack on Labour’s union links must not succeed (Independent)

These union-bashers are beholden to private interests, and want Labour to be, too, says Owen Jones.

3. Abu Qatada’s case shows the human rights system works (Times)

Could you bear your country sending a man to a torture chamber, asks Adam Wagner. 

4. Weary US consumer shoulders a big load (Financial Times)

With China slowing, Europe still stuck and Japan in doubt, America has a heroic task, says Edward Luce.

5. Andy Murray: a victory which is his alone (Guardian)

He referred to himself as a British champion while Alex Salmond rather unnecessarily waved the saltire from the royal box, notes a Guardian editorial.

6. Who wants a PM who has no fight in him? (Times)

In dealing with unions Ed Miliband settled for a quiet life, writes Tim Montgomerie. But voters won’t stand for high taxes and a bloated state.

7. We British go out of our way to avoid using the word ‘Muslim’ (Independent)

If reporters avoid using the word, we also risk missing out on the positive side of religious identity, says Robert Fisk. 

8. As Britain dithers, the rest of the world is getting things done (Daily Telegraph)

Our great projects are being stalled by endless consultations and grinding bureaucracy, writes Boris Johnson.

9. What makes a 'real African'? (Guardian)

Too often the continent's writers are quizzed about their identity rather than the world they create, says Maaza Mengiste. 

10. Help business by taxing  profits abroad (Financial Times)

The US should eliminate the distinction between foreign corporate profits, writes Lawrence Summers.

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Martin Sorrell: I support a second EU referendum

If the economy is not in great shape after two years, public opinion on Brexit could yet shift, says the WPP head.

On Labour’s weakness, if you take the market economy analogy, if you don’t have vigorous competitors you have a monopoly. That’s not good for prices and certainly not for competition. It breeds inefficiency, apathy, complacency, even arrogance. That applies to politics too.

A new party? Maybe, but Tom Friedman has a view that parties have outlived their purpose and with the changes that have taken place through globalisation, and will do through automation, what’s necessary is for parties not to realign but for new organisations and new structures to be developed.

Britain leaving the EU with no deal is a strong possibility. A lot of observers believe that will be the case, that it’s too complex a thing to work out within two years. To extend it beyond two years you need 27 states to approve.

The other thing one has to bear in mind is what’s going to happen to the EU over the next two years. There’s the French event to come, the German event and the possibility of an Italian event: an election or a referendum. If Le Pen was to win or if Merkel couldn’t form a government or if the Renzi and Berlusconi coalition lost out to Cinque Stelle, it might be a very different story. I think the EU could absorb a Portuguese exit or a Greek exit, or maybe even both of them exiting, I don’t think either the euro or the EU could withstand an Italian exit, which if Cinque Stelle was in control you might well see.

Whatever you think the long-term result would be, and I think the UK would grow faster inside than outside, even if Britain were to be faster outside, to get to that point is going to take a long time. The odds are there will be a period of disruption over the next two years and beyond. If we have a hard exit, which I think is the most likely outcome, it could be quite unpleasant in the short to medium term.

Personally, I do support a second referendum. Richard Branson says so, Tony Blair says so. I think the odds are diminishing all the time and with the triggering of Article 50 it will take another lurch down. But if things don’t get well over the two years, if the economy is not in great shape, maybe there will be a Brexit check at the end.

Martin Sorrell is the chairman and chief executive of WPP.

As told to George Eaton.

This article first appeared in the 30 March 2017 issue of the New Statesman, Wanted: an opposition