Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The Unite row is a crisis that Ed Miliband could turn into an opportunity (Observer)

The Labour leader needs to act boldly to emerge from his current woes looking stronger, writes Andrew Rawnsley.

2. Falkirk shows that Labour needs to mend, not end the Union links (Observer)

Ed Miliband pledges openness and reform in carefully worded op ed.

3. I urge Ed Miliband not to play into wrecking Tories' hands (Sunday Mirror)

Len McCluskey insists there was nothing wrong in Falkirk, blames Tories and Blairites.

4. Don't blame women if we ignore what passes for politics (Observer)

A report shows women disengaging from politics. Maybe that's because of the level of debate, ponders Catherine Bennett.

5. Sorry, Ed. It's too late to say you're no Union man (Independent on Sunday)

John Rentoul thinks the definitive moment for Miliband liberate himself has passed.

6. Everything hangs on Ed Miliband's battle with Labour's past (Sunday Telegraph)

Matthew D'Ancona identifies a pivotal moment in the destiny of the Labour party and its leader.

7. Lost in the muddle of the Middle East (Sunday Telegraph)

Jenny McCartney doesn't blame our leaders for hesitating before getting tangled in Egypt and Syria.

8. HS2 was never meant to be real, pull the emergency brake (Sunday Times)

Dominic Lawson joins the anti-High Speed Rail gang.

9. Miliband has got to restore trust or face defeat (Mail on Sunday)

David Blunkett joins the chorus urging the Labour leader to turn his battle with Unite into a leadership-defining episode.

10. Why I've quit the Privy Council after 19 years (Sunday Mirror)

John Prescott is fed up with lack of progress on a charter for press regulation.

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When Donald Trump talks, remember that Donald Trump almost always lies

Anyone getting excited about a trade deal between the United States and the United Kingdom should pay more attention to what Trump does, not what he says. 

Celebrations all round at the Times, which has bagged the first British newspaper interview with President-Elect Donald Trump.

Here are the headlines: he’s said that the EU has become a “vehicle for Germany”, that Nato is “obsolete” as it hasn’t focused on the big issue of the time (tackling Islamic terrorism), and that he expects that other countries will join the United Kingdom in leaving the European Union.

But what will trigger celebrations outside of the News Building is that Trump has this to say about a US-UK trade deal: his administration will ““work very hard to get it done quickly and done properly”. Time for champagne at Downing Street?

When reading or listening to an interview with Donald Trump, don’t forget that this is the man who has lied about, among other things, who really paid for gifts to charity on Celebrity Apprentice, being named Michigan’s Man of the Year in 2011, and making Mexico pay for a border wall between it and the United States. So take everything he promises with an ocean’s worth of salt, and instead look at what he does.   

Remember that in the same interview, the President-Elect threatened to hit BMW with sanctions over its decision to put a factory in Mexico, not the United States. More importantly, look at the people he is appointing to fill key trade posts: they are not free traders or anything like it. Anyone waiting for a Trump-backed trade deal that is “good for the UK” will wait a long time.

And as chess champion turned Putin-critic-in-chief Garry Kasparov notes on Twitter, it’s worth noting that Trump’s remarks on foreign affairs are near-identical to Putin’s. The idea that Nato’s traditional purpose is obsolete and that the focus should be on Islamic terrorism, meanwhile, will come as a shock to the Baltic states, and indeed, to the 650 British soldiers who have been sent to Estonia and Poland as part of a Nato deployment to deter Russian aggression against those countries.

All in all, I wouldn’t start declaring the new President is good news for the UK just yet.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.