Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The Unite row is a crisis that Ed Miliband could turn into an opportunity (Observer)

The Labour leader needs to act boldly to emerge from his current woes looking stronger, writes Andrew Rawnsley.

2. Falkirk shows that Labour needs to mend, not end the Union links (Observer)

Ed Miliband pledges openness and reform in carefully worded op ed.

3. I urge Ed Miliband not to play into wrecking Tories' hands (Sunday Mirror)

Len McCluskey insists there was nothing wrong in Falkirk, blames Tories and Blairites.

4. Don't blame women if we ignore what passes for politics (Observer)

A report shows women disengaging from politics. Maybe that's because of the level of debate, ponders Catherine Bennett.

5. Sorry, Ed. It's too late to say you're no Union man (Independent on Sunday)

John Rentoul thinks the definitive moment for Miliband liberate himself has passed.

6. Everything hangs on Ed Miliband's battle with Labour's past (Sunday Telegraph)

Matthew D'Ancona identifies a pivotal moment in the destiny of the Labour party and its leader.

7. Lost in the muddle of the Middle East (Sunday Telegraph)

Jenny McCartney doesn't blame our leaders for hesitating before getting tangled in Egypt and Syria.

8. HS2 was never meant to be real, pull the emergency brake (Sunday Times)

Dominic Lawson joins the anti-High Speed Rail gang.

9. Miliband has got to restore trust or face defeat (Mail on Sunday)

David Blunkett joins the chorus urging the Labour leader to turn his battle with Unite into a leadership-defining episode.

10. Why I've quit the Privy Council after 19 years (Sunday Mirror)

John Prescott is fed up with lack of progress on a charter for press regulation.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.