Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Falkirk may seem minor, but for Labour it really matters (Guardian)

The Unite union's tactics in the selection of parliamentary candidates are a direct challenge to Ed Miliband's leadership, writes Martin Kettle.

2. People Power (Times)

Now Egypt’s Army has taken control, its most important task is to relinquish it, says a Times editorial.

3. Egypt's coup: a ruinous intervention (Guardian)

Those who believe the Egyptian army's priority is to preserve freedom will soon be disappointed, says Jonathan Steele.

4. HS2 must not fail. If it does, investment in our future is doomed (Independent)

In this country a gimmick, like the Olympics, is required to justify spending, writes Steve Richards.

5. Why doors slam in Snowden’s face (Financial Times)

Who wants to pick a fight with the US over someone who has revealed what we knew, asks Philip Stephens.

6. To Lord Freud, a food bank is an excuse for a free lunch (Guardian)

The welfare minister's attempt to link the rise in food banks to greed rather than poverty shows a withered meanness, says Zoe Williams.

7. In or out, Britain has to play by Europe’s rules (Times)

Norway and Switzerland pay the costs of membership wth no say over EU law, writes John Cridland. That’s a bad deal for UK businesses.

8. The brave souls who resisted the march of state control (Daily Telegraph)

Professor Minogue was one of a small group of thinkers who fought for individual freedom, writes Peter Oborne.

9. What works at the Fed may not in Britain (Financial Times)

Forward guidance must be based on firm criteria, not least increased spending, writes Chris Giles.

10. Spying was simpler during the Cold War (Daily Telegraph)

You knew who your friends were during the Cold War – and you didn’t snoop on them, says Sue Cameron.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.