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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The Middle East faces years of disorder (Financial Times)

Arabs have concluded that if the US is quitting, they had better start fighting their own corners, writes Philip Stephens.

2. Labour should join Justin Welby's war on Wonga (Guardian)

The party should join faith groups to help the archbishop of Canterbury in his fight against usury, writes Maurice Glasman.

3. The royals are not like us. But they should be (Times)

Prince George’s birth is no time for republican arguments, writes Philip Collins. But it does show the need for a stripped-down monarchy.

4. The master strategist with the common touch (Daily Telegraph)

The rage directed at the Tories’ political strategist is a sure sign that he's doing his job well, says John McTernan.

5. At last, George Osborne has got in touch with his inner Keynes (Guardian)

With his buy-to-let scheme the chancellor is finally pumping cash to a more productive place than bank vaults, writes Simon Jenkins. 

6. Airy-fairy Lib Dems must face life outside the goldfish bowl (Daily Telegraph)

Clegg and his colleagues are trying their best to persuade activists to adopt a more grown-up approach to policy, writes Isabel Hardman.

7. Bo Xilai and how the mighty of China have fallen (Independent)

So many flowers of hubris and ambition are entwined in this story of China's communist aristocracy that it is hard to know what moral to draw from it, writes Peter Popham.

8. Growth must reach the north and low-earners (Times)

We must not return to the unbalanced British economy of the pre-crash years, writes George Osborne

9. Don’t blame the best-paid 1 per cent – they’re worth it (Daily Telegraph)

The wealthy have never forked out more and the lower-paid half of the populace have never had to pay a smaller share of income tax, writes Fraser Nelson.

10. No women over 50 allowed (unless it's Helen Mirren) (Guardian)

A generation of women is being bundled out of jobs at an alarming rate, and the world of work gets more insane as a result, writes Polly Toynbee.