Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. If you think Britain is on its way back to prosperity, think again, it's a mirage (Daily Telegraph)

None of the economy's structural flaws have been fixed and we still face a major crisis when interest rates go up, writes Allister Heath. 

2. Why New York survived but Detroit is dying (Times)

Britain should heed the lessons of how one city shook off its disastrous legacy but another has refused to, says Daniel Finkelstein.

3. A revitalised monarchy fills the chasm left by dreary politicians (Daily Telegraph)

Britain’s Royal family survived its dark days by embracing modernity, writes Mary Riddell. Ed Miliband, take note.

4. Britain's royal family: cut this anti-democratic dynasty out of politics (Guardian)

The monarchy embodies inequality and fosters conservatism, writes Seumas Milne. An elected head of state is embarrassingly overdue.

5. US should support a trade deal with Japan (Financial Times)

Currency manipulation suspicion is based on distant, isolated episodes, writes Adam Posen.

6. Were four killed? Or nine? In Egypt, the deaths keep racking up - and few pay any attention (Independent)

When Mubarak fell the country was bright  with optimism, writes Robert Fisk. Now life is cheap and the future brings only fear.

7. Housing market: build, build, build (Guardian)

The shortfall in new homes has led to bubbles, busts, a lopsided economy and misery for many unable to get on the ladder, says a Guardian editorial.

8. Opposition is to blame for Mugabe’s grip (Financial Times)

Party leaders must unite if they are to unseat Zimbabwe’s president, says Petina Gappah.

9. Message for the Poor (Times)

Pope Francis is helping to repair the Church’s confidence and moral authority, says a Times editorial.

10. Enjoy today, young prince. It's all downhill from here (Guardian)

The third in line to the throne cannot expect to enjoy the slightest privacy, says Simon Jenkins. The media drones are already overhead.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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