Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Falkirk may seem minor, but for Labour it really matters (Guardian)

The Unite union's tactics in the selection of parliamentary candidates are a direct challenge to Ed Miliband's leadership, writes Martin Kettle.

2. People Power (Times)

Now Egypt’s Army has taken control, its most important task is to relinquish it, says a Times editorial.

3. Egypt's coup: a ruinous intervention (Guardian)

Those who believe the Egyptian army's priority is to preserve freedom will soon be disappointed, says Jonathan Steele.

4. HS2 must not fail. If it does, investment in our future is doomed (Independent)

In this country a gimmick, like the Olympics, is required to justify spending, writes Steve Richards.

5. Why doors slam in Snowden’s face (Financial Times)

Who wants to pick a fight with the US over someone who has revealed what we knew, asks Philip Stephens.

6. To Lord Freud, a food bank is an excuse for a free lunch (Guardian)

The welfare minister's attempt to link the rise in food banks to greed rather than poverty shows a withered meanness, says Zoe Williams.

7. In or out, Britain has to play by Europe’s rules (Times)

Norway and Switzerland pay the costs of membership wth no say over EU law, writes John Cridland. That’s a bad deal for UK businesses.

8. The brave souls who resisted the march of state control (Daily Telegraph)

Professor Minogue was one of a small group of thinkers who fought for individual freedom, writes Peter Oborne.

9. What works at the Fed may not in Britain (Financial Times)

Forward guidance must be based on firm criteria, not least increased spending, writes Chris Giles.

10. Spying was simpler during the Cold War (Daily Telegraph)

You knew who your friends were during the Cold War – and you didn’t snoop on them, says Sue Cameron.

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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.