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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Cameron can’t say it, but the PM is set on another coalition (Daily Telegraph)

The electoral facts of life are stacked against the Conservatives, and the Prime Minister and his team know it, says Paul Goodman.

2. Enjoy this Con-Lib union while it lasts. Come the election it will all be over (Independent)

Clegg will struggle to get an agreement from his party for a renewal of the partnership, writes Steve Richards.

3. Why does Britain want to build airports for ghost planes? (Guardian)

The economic case for more capacity is based on defunct data: this policy will only drag us back to the planet-burning past, says George Monbiot.

4. Hizbollah has become a state above the state (Financial Times)

Those seeking stability in Lebanon do not see what keeps the country stable, writes David Gardner.

5. Will Labour have the guts to fight our unfair care system? (Guardian)

Few elderly people will live to qualify for this Tory 'reform', writes Polly Toynbee. The task of the opposition is to make it as universal as the NHS.

6. David Cameron must woo the school-run mums (Times)

The Prime Minister’s alpha male routine may play well with some voters but it is a turn off for women, says Rachel Sylvester.

7. Facts collide with ideology on Europe (Financial Times)

The UK audit of relations with the EU is coming up with awkward answers, writes Philip Stephens.

8. A very middle class baby who will secure the future of the royal family (Daily Mail)

It is this new royal prince, descended from Yorkshire wool merchants and Durham miners and labourers, who truly belongs to the people, says Michael Thornton. 

9. Why Europe needs 1.3 billion immigrants (Times)

Curbs are not too lax, they are far too strict, writes Oliver Kamm.

10. Slimmed-down police show that austerity is good for public services (Guardian)

By cutting crime with fewer officers, the police force has shown that the NHS and education can deliver more with less, argues Nick Herbert.