Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Labour politics: the meh index (Guardian)

Miliband needs to find a persuasive alternative vision to the one Cameron has to begun to sketch out, says a Guardian editorial.

2. The left talks gibberish while Cameron racks up successes (Daily Telegraph)

After three years, the Tory-Lib Dem coalition’s daring reforms are starting to pay dividends, says Peter Oborne.

3. Cameron wants to reform the NHS. But it was his government that handed over the levers (Independent)

The labyrinthine management structures of the NHS and BBC stymie change, says Steve Richards.

4. Primary school tests follow the Piccadilly Circus rule (Guardian)

Wait long enough and every education policy comes round again, writes Peter Wilby. New exams for younger pupils is the latest example.

5. Britain's rentier society fit for a royal (Financial Times)

Never mind education, hard work or getting a good job – having the right ancestors matters, writes Chris Giles.

6. After Liverpool we need a better way of dying (Times)

My time on the review of the controversial ‘care pathway’ showed me how unprepared most of us are for our end, writes David Aaronovitch.

7. Unemployment: signs of recovery that leave too many behind (Independent)

With long-term joblessness on the rise, the auguries are far from promising, says an Independent editorial.

8. Does Whitehall need more party placemen? (Daily Telegraph)

Reform of the Civil Service is overdue, but its impartiality may be under threat, says Sue Cameron.

9. Ten years ago today, Dr Kelly's body was found. The subsequent cover-up is one of the great scandals of our age (Daily Mail)

We still do not know for certain why or how Dr Kelly died, writes Stephen Glover.

10.  A strong leader in Japan is not a minus (Financial Times)

Love him or loathe him, Abe is someone with whom his foreign counterparts can do business, writes David Pilling.

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A man who accused a gay donkey of trying to rape his horse runs for Ukip leader

Another high-quality candidate.

John Rees-Evans, the Ukip candidate for Cardiff South and Penarth in the 2015 general election, is the latest to enter the Ukip leadership contest. And just as your mole thought bigotbait factory Breitbart’s Raheem Kassam was the fruitiest character in the running.

Rees-Evans, a Wales-based Ukipper who used to be in the army, is best-known for a bizarre story he told protesters outside his office in 2014. In which he accused a gay donkey of trying to rape his horse.

Having been asked to respond to a comment by a fellow party member – Julia Gasper – claiming “some homosexuals prefer sex with animals”, Rees-Evans replied:

“Actually, I’ve witnessed that. Yes! I was personally quite amazed. I’ve got a horse and it was there in the field. My horse is a stallion, right. And a donkey came up, which was male, and I’m afraid tried to rape my horse . . .

“So in this case, it’s obviously correct because the homosexual donkey tried to with an animal. But I don’t think that’s what it meant, it’s just a bizarre coincidence.”

Since making his bid for Ukip’s leadership, Rees-Evans has had to take back his controversial claim about the gay donkey on the BBC’s Daily Politics.

He said:

“It was a bit of playful banter with a mischievous activist, OK? . . . I concede it was a mistake to be playful with an activist in the street. The point is I’m not a politician. The guy was just asking me questions in the street. It was an error of judgement. I was very early coming into politics and I’m sorry if I offended anyone by doing that but please can we move on?”


Rees-Evans also made headlines by telling VICE that he persuaded IKEA staff to let him take a gun into a branch of IKEA in Bulgaria last year to protect him in the event of a terrorist siege.

Your mole thinks Nigel Farage is beginning to look like Abraham Lincoln.

I'm a mole, innit.