Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The NHS is not a creaking relic, whatever the Tories may say (Daily Telegraph)

The NHS is being asked to do too much with too few staff – but Andy Burnham might just have a cure, says Mary Riddell.

2. It's crunch time on Trident for Miliband and his party (Guardian)

Labour's leader can break with Blairite and Tory nuclear business as usual – and show some real statesmanship, writes Nick Harvey.

3. Lynton Crosby and the myth of neutrality (Financial Times)

Those who exert power in a democracy should be accountable, writes John McDermott.

4. Arab Spring? No, more of a temper tantrum (Times)

These uprisings are mostly incoherent protests by young people, writes Daniel Finkelstein. Only when they are older will democracy thrive.

5. The day Labour lost the moral high ground on the NHS (Daily Mail)

The Tories needn't be intimidated by Labour's 'record' on health care, says Simon Heffer.

6. The Egyptian coup is a warning to Turkey – but will Erdoğan listen? (Guardian)

Like the Muslim Brotherhood, Erdoğan's AK party has alienated opponents, writes James E Baldwin. Ennahda in Tunisia shows a way forward for democratic Islamists.

7. Can Crosby cross the line? (Daily Telegraph)

Campaign strategist Lynton Crosby has revived Conservative Party fortunes, but can he win them the general election, asks Iain Martin.

8. The Keogh report: Don’t judge the NHS by its failures (Independent)

With so much fur flying, the substantive issue risks being obscured, says an Independent editorial.

9. Globalisation in a time of transition (Financial Times)

Trade remains vulnerable to problems such as financial crises and inequality, says Martin Wolf.

10. Bernanke makes markets twitch but what counts is the economy (Independent)

Higher interest rates will be a signal the economy is healing, writes Hamish McRae.

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Donald Trump's healthcare failure could be to his advantage

The appearance of weakness is less electorally damaging than actually removing healthcare from millions of people.

Good morning. Is it all over for Donald Trump? His approval ratings have cratered to below 40%. Now his attempt to dismantle Barack Obama's healthcare reforms have hit serious resistance from within the Republican Party, adding to the failures and retreats of his early days in office.

The problem for the GOP is that their opposition to Obamacare had more to do with the word "Obama" than the word "care". The previous President opted for a right-wing solution to the problem of the uninsured in a doomed attempt to secure bipartisan support for his healthcare reform. The politician with the biggest impact on the structures of the Affordable Care Act is Mitt Romney.

But now that the Republicans control all three branches of government they are left in a situation where they have no alternative to Obamacare that wouldn't either a) shred conservative orthodoxies on healthcare or b) create numerous and angry losers in their constituencies. The difficulties for Trump's proposal is that it does a bit of both.

Now the man who ran on his ability to cut a deal has been forced to make a take it or leave plea to Republicans in the House of Representatives: vote for this plan or say goodbye to any chance of repealing Obamacare.

But that's probably good news for Trump. The appearance of weakness and failure is less electorally damaging than actually succeeding in removing healthcare from millions of people, including people who voted for Trump.

Trump won his first term because his own negatives as a candidate weren't quite enough to drag him down on a night when he underperformed Republican candidates across the country. The historical trends all make it hard for a first-term incumbent to lose. So far, Trump's administration is largely being frustrated by the Republican establishment though he is succeeding in leveraging the Presidency for the benefit of his business empire.

But it may be that in the failure to get anything done he succeeds in once again riding Republican coattails to victory in 2020.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.