Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The NHS is not a creaking relic, whatever the Tories may say (Daily Telegraph)

The NHS is being asked to do too much with too few staff – but Andy Burnham might just have a cure, says Mary Riddell.

2. It's crunch time on Trident for Miliband and his party (Guardian)

Labour's leader can break with Blairite and Tory nuclear business as usual – and show some real statesmanship, writes Nick Harvey.

3. Lynton Crosby and the myth of neutrality (Financial Times)

Those who exert power in a democracy should be accountable, writes John McDermott.

4. Arab Spring? No, more of a temper tantrum (Times)

These uprisings are mostly incoherent protests by young people, writes Daniel Finkelstein. Only when they are older will democracy thrive.

5. The day Labour lost the moral high ground on the NHS (Daily Mail)

The Tories needn't be intimidated by Labour's 'record' on health care, says Simon Heffer.

6. The Egyptian coup is a warning to Turkey – but will Erdoğan listen? (Guardian)

Like the Muslim Brotherhood, Erdoğan's AK party has alienated opponents, writes James E Baldwin. Ennahda in Tunisia shows a way forward for democratic Islamists.

7. Can Crosby cross the line? (Daily Telegraph)

Campaign strategist Lynton Crosby has revived Conservative Party fortunes, but can he win them the general election, asks Iain Martin.

8. The Keogh report: Don’t judge the NHS by its failures (Independent)

With so much fur flying, the substantive issue risks being obscured, says an Independent editorial.

9. Globalisation in a time of transition (Financial Times)

Trade remains vulnerable to problems such as financial crises and inequality, says Martin Wolf.

10. Bernanke makes markets twitch but what counts is the economy (Independent)

Higher interest rates will be a signal the economy is healing, writes Hamish McRae.

Getty
Show Hide image

Will Jeremy Corbyn stand down if Labour loses the general election?

Defeat at the polls might not be the end of Corbyn’s leadership.

The latest polls suggest that Labour is headed for heavy defeat in the June general election. Usually a general election loss would be the trigger for a leader to quit: Michael Foot, Gordon Brown and Ed Miliband all stood down after their first defeat, although Neil Kinnock saw out two losses before resigning in 1992.

It’s possible, if unlikely, that Corbyn could become prime minister. If that prospect doesn’t materialise, however, the question is: will Corbyn follow the majority of his predecessors and resign, or will he hang on in office?

Will Corbyn stand down? The rules

There is no formal process for the parliamentary Labour party to oust its leader, as it discovered in the 2016 leadership challenge. Even after a majority of his MPs had voted no confidence in him, Corbyn stayed on, ultimately winning his second leadership contest after it was decided that the current leader should be automatically included on the ballot.

This year’s conference will vote on to reform the leadership selection process that would make it easier for a left-wing candidate to get on the ballot (nicknamed the “McDonnell amendment” by centrists): Corbyn could be waiting for this motion to pass before he resigns.

Will Corbyn stand down? The membership

Corbyn’s support in the membership is still strong. Without an equally compelling candidate to put before the party, Corbyn’s opponents in the PLP are unlikely to initiate another leadership battle they’re likely to lose.

That said, a general election loss could change that. Polling from March suggests that half of Labour members wanted Corbyn to stand down either immediately or before the general election.

Will Corbyn stand down? The rumours

Sources close to Corbyn have said that he might not stand down, even if he leads Labour to a crushing defeat this June. They mention Kinnock’s survival after the 1987 general election as a precedent (although at the 1987 election, Labour did gain seats).

Will Corbyn stand down? The verdict

Given his struggles to manage his own MPs and the example of other leaders, it would be remarkable if Corbyn did not stand down should Labour lose the general election. However, staying on after a vote of no-confidence in 2016 was also remarkable, and the mooted changes to the leadership election process give him a reason to hold on until September in order to secure a left-wing succession.

0800 7318496