Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Using NHS as a football will be a Tory own goal (Times)

Downing Street’s determination to drop its consensual line on health service failures could backfire with voters, says Rachel Sylvester.

2. UK benefits cap is great politics but cynical policy (Financial Times)

It is a mistake to think the limit is anything other than a symbol, writes John McDermott.

3. The coalition failed to act on my concerns about the NHS (Daily Telegraph)

Ministers' determination to pin responsibility for any problems revealed by the Keogh report on the last government is cynical politicking, says Andy Burnham.

4. Cigarette packaging: the corporate smokescreen (Guardian)

Noble sentiments about individual liberty are being used to bend democracy to the will of the tobacco industry, writes George Monbiot.

5. Britain should rise above Russian might (Financial Times)

By blocking a public inquiry into Litvinenko, the UK plays to the most cynical Putin-esque instincts, says Gideon Rachman.

6. Race is a constant in US life - as elsewhere (Independent)

The death of Trayvon Martin has proved that race is still a factor in national life – but name one country on earth which has a significant racial minority where it is not, writes Rupert Cornwell.

7. You can't nurture families as the government is uprooting them (Guardian)

A report advocating a reprise of the Sure Start vision is heart-warming but seems unreal as the coalition cuts and cuts, says Polly Toynbee.

8. We must answer the 100,000-euro question (Daily Telegraph)

Britain cannot debate leaving the EU properly without a good idea of what it would mean, writes Gisela Stuart.

9. Let’s not rest until we’ve stubbed out smoking (Times)

Having a cigarette is not a human right, says Oliver Kamm. 

10. If Samantha Cameron's 'grounded', I'm the next Tory PM (Guardian)

Fawning over the prime minister's unelected, aristocratic wife fits the pattern of a party that still doesn't take women seriously, says Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett.

YouTube screengrab
Show Hide image

“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.