Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Here’s how the Conservatives can win back the working class (Daily Telegraph)

Labour is losing in areas such as the North East, where voters long for an economic revival, writes David Skelton.

2. Open season on black boys after a verdict like this (Guardian)

Calls for calm made after killer of Trayvon Martin was acquitted of murder are empty words for black families, says Gary Younge.

3. For Tories, privatisation is still a matter of dogmatic faith (Independent)

The breadth of opposition to Royal Mail privatisation is hardly surprising, writes Owen Jones. Britons have endured a three-decade-long experiment of selling off our utilities and public services.

4. You’ve been Sammed: No 10’s real moderniser (Times)

From arming the Syrian rebels to gay marriage, the Prime Minister’s policies tend to reflect his wife’s core values, writes Tim Montgomerie.

5. Simpson and Bowles are wrong on US debt (Financial Times)

The deficit hawks were mistaken before 2008 and they remain so, writes Edward Luce.

6. By taking sides within sides, Rifkind risks a repeat of Balkans mistakes in Syria (Independent)

It was the Spanish Civil War in the 1930s and the Bosnian War in the 1990s, writes Robert Fisk. Today's superpowers are fighting in Syria, but lets be in no doubt as to their motivations.

7. Tunisia is the model for a new Egypt (Financial Times)

Egyptians should realise that everyone lost when they ceased co-operating, says Marwan Muasher.

8. The writers Alex Salmond is courting now will hold him to account (Guardian)

The arts world may be galvanised by the yes campaign but are likely to ask serious questions of the SNP after independence, writes Alan Bissett.

9. A Register of Lobbyists (Times)

The process by which policy decisions are made should be transparent, says a Times editorial.

10. Letting developers vandalise the countryside won't solve housing crisis (Guardian)

Cynically relaxing planning controls puts rural Britain at risk while doing nothing to ease the housing shortage in our cities, writes Nick Herbert.

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Douglas Carswell leaves Ukip to become independent MP

The Clacton MP quits his party but insists he will not rejoin the Conservatives or trigger a by-election. 

Douglas Carswell has long been a Ukip MP in name only. Now he isn't even that. Ukip's sole MP, who defected from the Conservatives in 2014, has announced that he is leaving the party.

Carswell's announcement comes as no great surprise. He has long endured a comically antagonistic relationship with Nigel Farage, who last month demanded his expulsion for the sin of failing to aid his knighthood bid. The Clacton MP's ambition to transform Ukip into a libertarian force, rather than a reactionary one, predictably failed. With the party now often polling in single figures, below the Liberal Democrats, the MP has left a sinking ship (taking £217,000 of opposition funding or "short money" with him). As Carswell acknowledges in his statement, Brexit has deprieved Ukip of its raison d'être.

He writes: "Ukip might not have managed to win many seats in Parliament, but in a way we are the most successful political party in Britain ever. We have achieved what we were established to do – and in doing so we have changed the course of our country's history for the better. Make no mistake; we would not be leaving the EU if it was not for Ukip – and for those remarkable people who founded, supported and sustained our party over that period.

"Our party has prevailed thanks to the heroic efforts of Ukip party members and supporters. You ensured we got a referendum. With your street stalls and leafleting, you helped Vote Leave win the referendum. You should all be given medals for what you helped make happen – and face the future with optimism.

"Like many of you, I switched to Ukip because I desperately wanted us to leave the EU. Now we can be certain that that is going to happen, I have decided that I will be leaving Ukip."

Though Ukip could yet recover if Theresa May disappoints anti-immigration voters, that's not a path that the pro-migration Carswell would wish to pursue. He insists that he has no intention of returning to the Conservatives (and will not trigger a new by-election). "I will simply be the Member of Parliament for Clacton, sitting as an independent."

Carswell's erstwhile Conservative colleagues will no doubt delight in reminding him that he was warned.  

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.