Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Here’s how the Conservatives can win back the working class (Daily Telegraph)

Labour is losing in areas such as the North East, where voters long for an economic revival, writes David Skelton.

2. Open season on black boys after a verdict like this (Guardian)

Calls for calm made after killer of Trayvon Martin was acquitted of murder are empty words for black families, says Gary Younge.

3. For Tories, privatisation is still a matter of dogmatic faith (Independent)

The breadth of opposition to Royal Mail privatisation is hardly surprising, writes Owen Jones. Britons have endured a three-decade-long experiment of selling off our utilities and public services.

4. You’ve been Sammed: No 10’s real moderniser (Times)

From arming the Syrian rebels to gay marriage, the Prime Minister’s policies tend to reflect his wife’s core values, writes Tim Montgomerie.

5. Simpson and Bowles are wrong on US debt (Financial Times)

The deficit hawks were mistaken before 2008 and they remain so, writes Edward Luce.

6. By taking sides within sides, Rifkind risks a repeat of Balkans mistakes in Syria (Independent)

It was the Spanish Civil War in the 1930s and the Bosnian War in the 1990s, writes Robert Fisk. Today's superpowers are fighting in Syria, but lets be in no doubt as to their motivations.

7. Tunisia is the model for a new Egypt (Financial Times)

Egyptians should realise that everyone lost when they ceased co-operating, says Marwan Muasher.

8. The writers Alex Salmond is courting now will hold him to account (Guardian)

The arts world may be galvanised by the yes campaign but are likely to ask serious questions of the SNP after independence, writes Alan Bissett.

9. A Register of Lobbyists (Times)

The process by which policy decisions are made should be transparent, says a Times editorial.

10. Letting developers vandalise the countryside won't solve housing crisis (Guardian)

Cynically relaxing planning controls puts rural Britain at risk while doing nothing to ease the housing shortage in our cities, writes Nick Herbert.

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How Theresa May laid a trap for herself on the immigration target

When Home Secretary, she insisted on keeping foreign students in the figures – causing a headache for herself today.

When Home Secretary, Theresa May insisted that foreign students should continue to be counted in the overall immigration figures. Some cabinet colleagues, including then Business Secretary Vince Cable and Chancellor George Osborne wanted to reverse this. It was economically illiterate. Current ministers, like the Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, Chancellor Philip Hammond and Home Secretary Amber Rudd, also want foreign students exempted from the total.

David Cameron’s government aimed to cut immigration figures – including overseas students in that aim meant trying to limit one of the UK’s crucial financial resources. They are worth £25bn to the UK economy, and their fees make up 14 per cent of total university income. And the impact is not just financial – welcoming foreign students is diplomatically and culturally key to Britain’s reputation and its relationship with the rest of the world too. Even more important now Brexit is on its way.

But they stayed in the figures – a situation that, along with counterproductive visa restrictions also introduced by May’s old department, put a lot of foreign students off studying here. For example, there has been a 44 per cent decrease in the number of Indian students coming to Britain to study in the last five years.

Now May’s stubbornness on the migration figures appears to have caught up with her. The Times has revealed that the Prime Minister is ready to “soften her longstanding opposition to taking foreign students out of immigration totals”. It reports that she will offer to change the way the numbers are calculated.

Why the u-turn? No 10 says the concession is to ensure the Higher and Research Bill, key university legislation, can pass due to a Lords amendment urging the government not to count students as “long-term migrants” for “public policy purposes”.

But it will also be a factor in May’s manifesto pledge (and continuation of Cameron’s promise) to cut immigration to the “tens of thousands”. Until today, ministers had been unclear about whether this would be in the manifesto.

Now her u-turn on student figures is being seized upon by opposition parties as “massaging” the migration figures to meet her target. An accusation for which May only has herself, and her steadfast politicising of immigration, to blame.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

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