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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Here’s how the Conservatives can win back the working class (Daily Telegraph)

Labour is losing in areas such as the North East, where voters long for an economic revival, writes David Skelton.

2. Open season on black boys after a verdict like this (Guardian)

Calls for calm made after killer of Trayvon Martin was acquitted of murder are empty words for black families, says Gary Younge.

3. For Tories, privatisation is still a matter of dogmatic faith (Independent)

The breadth of opposition to Royal Mail privatisation is hardly surprising, writes Owen Jones. Britons have endured a three-decade-long experiment of selling off our utilities and public services.

4. You’ve been Sammed: No 10’s real moderniser (Times)

From arming the Syrian rebels to gay marriage, the Prime Minister’s policies tend to reflect his wife’s core values, writes Tim Montgomerie.

5. Simpson and Bowles are wrong on US debt (Financial Times)

The deficit hawks were mistaken before 2008 and they remain so, writes Edward Luce.

6. By taking sides within sides, Rifkind risks a repeat of Balkans mistakes in Syria (Independent)

It was the Spanish Civil War in the 1930s and the Bosnian War in the 1990s, writes Robert Fisk. Today's superpowers are fighting in Syria, but lets be in no doubt as to their motivations.

7. Tunisia is the model for a new Egypt (Financial Times)

Egyptians should realise that everyone lost when they ceased co-operating, says Marwan Muasher.

8. The writers Alex Salmond is courting now will hold him to account (Guardian)

The arts world may be galvanised by the yes campaign but are likely to ask serious questions of the SNP after independence, writes Alan Bissett.

9. A Register of Lobbyists (Times)

The process by which policy decisions are made should be transparent, says a Times editorial.

10. Letting developers vandalise the countryside won't solve housing crisis (Guardian)

Cynically relaxing planning controls puts rural Britain at risk while doing nothing to ease the housing shortage in our cities, writes Nick Herbert.