Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Why I no longer support a new high-speed rail line (Financial Times)

All the parties – especially Labour – should think twice before binding themselves irrevocably to HS2, writes Peter Mandelson.

2. Miliband hopes his tortoise will prevail over the Cameron hare (Daily Telegraph)

The Labour leader’s calm belies an air of frustration among many MPs and supporters, writes Mary Riddell.

3. We no longer believe the left will look after us (Times)

Large majorities of voters think Europe’s governments tax unfairly and spend inefficiently, writes Peter Kellner.

4. To rein in top pay, keep MPs poor and furious (Guardian)

As long as politicians harbour a pay grievance against public sector colleagues, they are more likely to guard the public purse, writes Simon Jenkins.

5. How can we be confident that things are really getting better? (Independent)

There have been so many disappointments over the economic recovery that caution is wise, writes Hamish McRae. So which green shoots are the ones we can rely on?

6. Egypt, Brazil, Turkey: without politics, protest is at the mercy of the elite (Guardian)

From Egypt to Brazil, street action is driving change, but organisation is essential if it's not to be hijacked or disarmed, says Seumas Milne.

7. Risks of a hard landing for China (Financial Times)

Beijing might need to do what its leaders neither want nor expect, writes Martin Wolf.

8. Don’t be tempted by nice Nigel Farage (Daily Telegraph)

Labour could well win the next general election if the Tories let down their guard, says Chris Grayling.

9. Most gay people still fear a knock at the door (Times)

Millions are persecuted for being homosexual, writes Daniel Finkelstein. The pursuit of global equality is still one of the great civil rights causes.

10. George Osborne's latest flop over 'shares for rights' is typical of modern government (Independent)

This measure's history says a lot about the replacement of ideology with marketing, says Andreas Whittam Smith. 

Show Hide image

Appreciate the full horror of Nigel Farage's pro-Trump speech

The former Ukip leader has appeared at a Donald Trump rally. It went exactly as you would expect.

It is with a heavy heart that I must announce Nigel Farage is at it again.

The on-again, off-again Ukip leader and current Member of the European Parliament has appeared at a Donald Trump rally to lend his support to the presidential candidate.

It was, predictably, distressing.

Farage started by telling his American audience why they, like he, should be positive.

"I come to you from the United Kingdom"

Okay, good start. Undeniably true.

"– with a message of hope –

Again, probably quite true.

Image: Clearly hopeful (Wikipedia Screenshot)

– and optimism.”

Ah.

Image: Nigel Farage in front of a poster showing immigrants who are definitely not European (Getty)

He continues: “If the little people, if the real people–”

Wait, what?

Why is Trump nodding sagely at this?

The little people?

Image: It's a plane with the name Trump on it (Wikimedia Commons)

THE LITTLE PEOPLE?

Image: It's the word Trump on the side of a skyscraper I can't cope with this (Pixel)

THE ONLY LITTLE PERSON CLOSE TO TRUMP IS RIDING A MASSIVE STUFFED LION

Image: I don't even know what to tell you. It's Trump and his wife and a child riding a stuffed lion. 

IN A PENTHOUSE

A PENTHOUSE WHICH LOOKS LIKE LIBERACE WAS LET LOOSE WITH THE GILT ON DAY FIVE OF A PARTICULARLY BAD BENDER

Image: So much gold. Just gold, everywhere.

HIS WIFE HAS SO MANY BAGS SHE HAS TO EMPLOY A BAG MAN TO CARRY THEM

Image: I did not even know there were so many styles of Louis Vuitton, and my dentists has a lot of old copies of Vogue.

Anyway. Back to Farage, who is telling the little people that they can win "against the forces of global corporatism".

 

Image: Aaaaarggghhhh (Wikipedia Screenshot)

Ugh. Okay. What next? Oh god, he's telling them they can have a Brexit moment.

“... you can beat Washington...”

“... if enough decent people...”

“...are prepared to stand up against the establishment”

Image: A screenshot from Donald Trump's Wikipedia page.

I think I need a lie down.

Watch the full clip here:

Stephanie Boland is digital assistant at the New Statesman. She tweets at @stephanieboland