Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. In Egypt, we thought democracy was enough. It was not (Guardian)

Mohamed Morsi broke his promises to the Egyptian people, writes Ahdaf Soueif. He must go, and the revolution must continue.

2. British left is turning against Europe (Financial Times)

Labour is watching the social market become less social and more of a market, writes Janan Ganesh.

3. Labour's spending worked. Why don't they defend it? (Guardian)

Blair and Brown improved schools and hospitals and cut poverty – but never embedded this agenda in the national psyche, writes Polly Toynbee. 

4. Does Len McCluskey or Ed Miliband run Labour? (Times)

The Labour leader cannot let a trade union boss dictate who his MPs are, says Rachel Sylvester. He must show he’s in charge.

5. Mark Carney is hailed as a saviour – but what do we really know about him? (Guardian)

The new Bank of England governor's CV contains details that should give one pause – such as that decade spent in the Goldman Sachs shark pool, says Aditya Chakrabortty.

6. The Tories must beware these feelings of irrational exuberance (Daily Telegraph)

The polls are going the party’s way, but the odds remain stacked against a win in 2015, writes Benedict Brogan.

7. Will Ed win this EU battle, but lose the war? (Independent)

Without Labour or Lib Dem participation, the vote on a referendum this Friday will be a farce - but , eventually, Miliband must decide one way or the other, writes John Rentoul.

The most vociferous critics expected far more than a mere mortal could deliver, writes Gideon Rachman.

9. For-profit state schools should not be ruled out (Independent)

The focus must be on the quality of the service, not the mechanism by which it is provided, says an Independent editorial. 

10. Keep the rot from the system – give MPs a rise (Daily Telegraph)

Politicians should take a back seat on the issue of their pay, and leave it to Ipsa to decide, says Jack Straw.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.