Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. In Egypt, we thought democracy was enough. It was not (Guardian)

Mohamed Morsi broke his promises to the Egyptian people, writes Ahdaf Soueif. He must go, and the revolution must continue.

2. British left is turning against Europe (Financial Times)

Labour is watching the social market become less social and more of a market, writes Janan Ganesh.

3. Labour's spending worked. Why don't they defend it? (Guardian)

Blair and Brown improved schools and hospitals and cut poverty – but never embedded this agenda in the national psyche, writes Polly Toynbee. 

4. Does Len McCluskey or Ed Miliband run Labour? (Times)

The Labour leader cannot let a trade union boss dictate who his MPs are, says Rachel Sylvester. He must show he’s in charge.

5. Mark Carney is hailed as a saviour – but what do we really know about him? (Guardian)

The new Bank of England governor's CV contains details that should give one pause – such as that decade spent in the Goldman Sachs shark pool, says Aditya Chakrabortty.

6. The Tories must beware these feelings of irrational exuberance (Daily Telegraph)

The polls are going the party’s way, but the odds remain stacked against a win in 2015, writes Benedict Brogan.

7. Will Ed win this EU battle, but lose the war? (Independent)

Without Labour or Lib Dem participation, the vote on a referendum this Friday will be a farce - but , eventually, Miliband must decide one way or the other, writes John Rentoul.

The most vociferous critics expected far more than a mere mortal could deliver, writes Gideon Rachman.

9. For-profit state schools should not be ruled out (Independent)

The focus must be on the quality of the service, not the mechanism by which it is provided, says an Independent editorial. 

10. Keep the rot from the system – give MPs a rise (Daily Telegraph)

Politicians should take a back seat on the issue of their pay, and leave it to Ipsa to decide, says Jack Straw.

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Theresa May knows she's talking nonsense - here's why she's doing it

The Prime Minister's argument increases the sense that this is a time to "lend" - in her words - the Tories your vote.

Good morning.  Angela Merkel and Theresa May are more similar politicians than people think, and that holds true for Brexit too. The German Chancellor gave a speech yesterday, and the message: Brexit means Brexit.

Of course, the emphasis is slightly different. When May says it, it's about reassuring the Brexit elite in SW1 that she isn't going to backslide, and anxious Remainers and soft Brexiteers in the country that it will work out okay in the end.

When Merkel says it, she's setting out what the EU wants and the reality of third country status outside the European Union.  She's also, as with May, tilting to her own party and public opinion in Germany, which thinks that the UK was an awkward partner in the EU and is being even more awkward in the manner of its leaving.

It's a measure of how poor the debate both during the referendum and its aftermath is that Merkel's bland statement of reality - "A third-party state - and that's what Britain will be - can't and won't be able to have the same rights, let alone a better position than a member of the European Union" - feels newsworthy.

In the short term, all this helps Theresa May. Her response - delivered to a carefully-selected audience of Leeds factory workers, the better to avoid awkward questions - that the EU is "ganging up" on Britain is ludicrous if you think about it. A bloc of nations acting in their own interest against their smaller partners - colour me surprised!

But in terms of what May wants out of this election - a massive majority that gives her carte blanche to implement her agenda and puts Labour out of contention for at least a decade - it's a great message. It increases the sense that this is a time to "lend" - in May's words - the Tories your vote. You may be unhappy about the referendum result, you may usually vote Labour - but on this occasion, what's needed is a one-off Tory vote to make Brexit a success.

May's message is silly if you pay any attention to how the EU works or indeed to the internal politics of the EU27. That doesn't mean it won't be effective.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

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