Morning Call: pick of the paper

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Beijing's Play for Porn (IHT)

When it comes to pornography, the Chinese government is guilty of naked hypocrisy, writes Clarissa Sebag-Montefiore.

2. I've got a crush on the archbishope of Canterbury (Guardian)

Marina Hyde: It's not going to make me a believer or anything, but bravo to Justin Welby for taking a stand on Wonga and co.

3. Nate Silver, data guru returns to sport (FT) (£)

The political forecaster shows the new power of one-man brands, says Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson.

4. HS2, fracking and planning have given rise to mutiny in Middle England (Telegraph)

The demonstrations in Balcombe over drilling for oil and gas reserves are just the beginning, write Geoffrey Lean.

5. The cult of home ownership is dangerous and damaging (FT) (£)

The US and UK should ditch their obsessions with residential property, writes Adam Posen.

6. George Osborne's description of the economy is near-Orwellian (Guardian)

The fact that even Labour accepts the UK is 'on the mend' shows how low our expectations of economic performance are, reckons Ha-Joon Chang.

7. I was a self-hating child, so if it’s a choice between babies and my 100-year-old mother-in-law... (Independent)

The old make for far more stimulating company than the young, argues Howard Jacobson.

8. Holy Moolah. The Church really does save (Times) (£)

Archbishop Welby’s crusade against payday lenders is a very Christian solution to a problem afflicting the poor, says Janice Turner.

9. The hidden cost of paying for GP appointments (Independent)

Attempts to monetise the NHS have wilted in the past. It won't work here, says Jeremy Laurance.

10. We celebrate the Royal family because it symbolises our liberty (Telegraph)

The monarchy may reign over us, but it too is subject to the rule of ancient law, says Daniel Hannan.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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