Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. On the topic of political meddling, RBS and the like can shut up (Guardian)

Stephen Hester wanted to turn RBS into a 'normal' bank, but it wasn't his to turn, writes Simon Jenkins. After £45bn, government can do what it wants.

2. Osborne should not have meddled (Financial Times)

The chancellor has interfered in areas better left to managers, writes Jonathan Ford.

3. If only Britain had joined the euro (Guardian)

If Gordon Brown had chosen to join the single currency 10 years ago, both the European Union and Britain would be stronger now, says Will Hutton.

4. Politicians place too much faith in figures (Daily Telegraph)

Data is a useful tool, but over-reliance on it means major problems are too often ignored, says Fraser Nelson. 

5. Why Ofsted is wrong about bright children in comprehensives (Guardian)

Ofsted is playing to Michael Gove's agenda by scaremongering about bright children, writes Peter Wilby. The facts tell a different story.

6. Labour’s addicted to meddling, not spending (Times

The party must stop thinking the state can solve every problem and trust ordinary people to fix their own lives, says Philip Collins. 

7. I’ve got no time for page three, but... (Daily Telegraph)

Glossy magazines jammed with size-zero models are far more worthy of our scorn, writes Isabel Hardman.

8. Government must tread fine balance in building the information economy (Independent)

The opportunities are huge, but so are the risks, writes Vince Cable. 

9. Failure of Leadership (Times

Nick Clegg knew there were serious allegations against Lord Rennard, yet he failed to act in a fair and effective manner, says a Times leader. 

10. Cease this talk of competitiveness (Financial Times)

The word makes much of trade, economic and even foreign policy sound like a zero-sum game, writes Samuel Brittan. 

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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.