Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. On the topic of political meddling, RBS and the like can shut up (Guardian)

Stephen Hester wanted to turn RBS into a 'normal' bank, but it wasn't his to turn, writes Simon Jenkins. After £45bn, government can do what it wants.

2. Osborne should not have meddled (Financial Times)

The chancellor has interfered in areas better left to managers, writes Jonathan Ford.

3. If only Britain had joined the euro (Guardian)

If Gordon Brown had chosen to join the single currency 10 years ago, both the European Union and Britain would be stronger now, says Will Hutton.

4. Politicians place too much faith in figures (Daily Telegraph)

Data is a useful tool, but over-reliance on it means major problems are too often ignored, says Fraser Nelson. 

5. Why Ofsted is wrong about bright children in comprehensives (Guardian)

Ofsted is playing to Michael Gove's agenda by scaremongering about bright children, writes Peter Wilby. The facts tell a different story.

6. Labour’s addicted to meddling, not spending (Times

The party must stop thinking the state can solve every problem and trust ordinary people to fix their own lives, says Philip Collins. 

7. I’ve got no time for page three, but... (Daily Telegraph)

Glossy magazines jammed with size-zero models are far more worthy of our scorn, writes Isabel Hardman.

8. Government must tread fine balance in building the information economy (Independent)

The opportunities are huge, but so are the risks, writes Vince Cable. 

9. Failure of Leadership (Times

Nick Clegg knew there were serious allegations against Lord Rennard, yet he failed to act in a fair and effective manner, says a Times leader. 

10. Cease this talk of competitiveness (Financial Times)

The word makes much of trade, economic and even foreign policy sound like a zero-sum game, writes Samuel Brittan. 

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Andy Burnham's full speech on attack: "Manchester is waking up to the most difficult of dawns"

"We are grieving today, but we are strong."

Following Monday night's terror attack on an Ariana Grande concert at the Manchester Arena, newly elected mayor of the city Andy Burnham, gave a speech outside Manchester Town Hall on Tuesday morning, the full text of which is below: 

After our darkest of nights, Manchester is today waking up to the most difficult of dawns. 

It’s hard to believe what has happened here in the last few hours and to put into words the shock, anger and hurt that we feel today.

These were children, young people and their families that those responsible chose to terrorise and kill.

This was an evil act. Our first thoughts are with the families of those killed and injured. And we will do whatever we can to support them.

We are grieving today, but we are strong. Today it will be business as usual as far as possible in our great city.

I want to thank the hundreds of police, fire and ambulance staff who worked throughout the night in the most difficult circumstances imaginable.

We have had messages of support from cities around the country and across the world, and we want to thank them for that.

But lastly I wanted to thank the people of Manchester. Even in the minute after the attack, they opened their doors to strangers and drove them away from danger.

They gave the best possible immediate response to those who seek to divide us and it will be that spirit of Manchester that will prevail and hold us together.

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