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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Surveillance in the US and UK: Spreading national insecurity (Guardian)

Where legislatures and judges fail, whistleblowers keep open the only channel left for public accountability, says a Guardian editorial.

2. Erdogan is confronting a new Sixties spirit (Times)

European leaders can help the cause of reform by bringing Turkey into the EU fold, says Jack Straw.

3. Hail the honest about Greece's bailout (Financial Times)

The IMF’s admission is welcome but the hard part will be acting on it, says Wolfgang Münchau.

4. Ahmadinejad’s successor is supposed to be chosen by the people, not guardians (Independent)

This is not a real election for Iran but a competition between clerical favourites, writes Robert Fisk.

5. The People's Assembly will cohere the left - and finally give Labour some real competition (Independent)

The anti-austerity gathering will not only be a show of force, but a launchpad for a missing force in British politics, says Owen Jones.

6. At last, the parties get serious on spending (Daily Telegraph)

Ed Balls’s conversion over pension costs has thrown down the gauntlet to the Tories, says Andrew Haldenby.

7. Churches must fight to keep their freedom (Times)

The campaign against gay marriage was a mistake, writes Tim Montgomerie. Religious liberty itself is under threat from a new intolerance.

8. The bedroom tax has made huge problems even worse (Guardian)

The government's housing benefit changes are a mess, ramping up arrears and emptying out streets, writes John Harris. But what would Labour do differently?

9. Can Osborne defuse our debt timebomb? (Sun)

A nudge towards devaluation, without real evidence that the UK is serious about cutting debt, could trigger a full-blown currency crisis, writes Trevor Kavanagh. 

10. The proud moment when I realised I was worth hacking (Daily Telegraph)

A strange, late-night message confirmed my suspicions – internet privacy doesn’t exist, writes Boris Johnson.