Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Miliband and Balls look to the past to plan for their future (Independent)

The Labour leader and shadow chancellor are unusual in having experience of shaping policy while working in opposition, writes Steve Richards.

2. Why has Cameron put us on al-Qaeda's side? (Daily Telegraph)

Just like Tony Blair over Iraq, the Prime Minister has lost touch with reality when it comes to Syria, says Peter Oborne.

3. France should copy Germany’s reforms (Financial Times)

Staying ahead in competitiveness on a worldwide scale must be the priority for France and for Europe, says Gerhard Schröder.

4. Sometimes it’s right to tell voters they’re wrong (Times)

Everyone knows some hospitals must close to improve healthcare, writes David Aaronovitch. Politicians on all sides must make the case.

5. Me-first parents do the rest of us an injustice (Guardian)

Like James Caan, I want the best for my children, writes Zoe Williams. But seeing people in power privileging their own just entrenches inequality.

6. Wash the dirty linen in private, minister (Daily Telegraph)

Politicians’ relentless criticism of their civil servants is bad manners – and bad tactics, says Sue Cameron.

7. How the French lost their je ne sais quoi (Independent)

They see globalisation as a process that destroys individual cultures and identities, writes Andreas Whittam Smith.

8. At last it’s springtime for Britain’s economy (Times)

Barely a month ago, the talk was of a triple-dip recession, writes Ian King. Now the momentum is growing.

9. I admit it - I hog the middle lane. But how will picking my pocket make our roads safer? (Daily Mail)

Bit by bit, our freedoms are eroding under this Tory-led government, says Stephen Glover.

10. Google is this era’s General Electric (Financial Times)

Larry Page has boundless ambition and the capacity to deliver unexpected products, writes John Gapper.

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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.