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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. In language and action, there's a new brutalism in Westminster (Observer)

George Osborne is not interested in helping people, writes Will Hutton. His purpose is political positioning.

2. Foreign media portrayals of the conflict in Syria are dangerously inaccurate (Independent on Sunday)

It is naive not to accept that both sides are capable of manipulating the facts to serve their own interests, writes Patrick Cockburn.

3. Nelson Mandela taught the Tories the value of trust in politics (Sunday Telegraph)

The Conservative Party’s shifting relationship with the great South African leader reflects a significant change in its style and attitude, writes Matthew d'Ancona.

4. Osborne has turned an omni-shambles into an omni-rout and buried 'borrow more' Ed Miliband (Mail on Sunday)

The Chancellor cemented the Tories' victory in the battle of ideas, and opened a new political era, says Michael Portillo.

5. Labour's big problem isn't being different: it's how to look credible (Observer)

Voters won't doubt that the Eds would change things, writes Andrew Rawnsley. They do need persuading that their sums would add up.

6. The election will be fought on benefits (Independent on Sunday)

The Chancellor and his shadow are manoeuvring skilfully for the vote-winning position between social justice and fiscal prudence, writes John Rentoul.

7. George zips ahead but his young friends will pay (Sunday Times)

The Tories shouldn't take false comfort from the Spending Review, suggests Adam Boulton.

8. Hate porn, sure, but be wary of banning it (Observer)

The principle that consenting adults are free to watch what they want is worth defending, says Nick Cohen.

9. Dear Sir Humphrey, Please stop churning out pompous, windy letters. Yours sincerely, Michael Gove (Mail on Sunday)

Every minister has something they are punctilious about, says James Forsyth. For Michael Gove, it is how letters are written.

10. It’s no longer unthinkable to shrink the state (Sunday Telegraph)

The political parties are having to scramble to keep up with the realism of most voters, says Janet Daley.