Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. From rescue to recovery? It's not as simple as that, George (Independent)

Labour’s position in relation to spending is more astute than the Chancellor suggests, writes Steve Richards. 

2. Balls appeals to the few, Osborne the many (Guardian)

Labour's attack on the chancellor's spending plans is smart, but will only work with those who have made their minds up, says Martin Kettle. 

3. Julia Gillard: Sadly, this lady was for turning (Independent)

As with Thatcher, she had become an electoral liability to her party, writes Geoffrey Robertson.

4. Soon, we are likely to need a braver chancellor than this one (Daily Telegraph)

Osborne is good at the politics, but flunks the economics, writes Peter Oborne. For how long can this continue?

5. George Osborne master of the game of divisive politics (Guardian)

The Chancellor has tried to gloss over a dire financial situation by playing the game he knows best, writes Jonathan Freedland. 

6. Gordon Brown's plans to join the euro (Daily Telegraph)

The great saviour of the pound actually toyed with ditching it, says Sue Cameron.

7. On the spectrum of deceit, ministers have gone off the scale (Guardian)

Statistics have long been argued one way or the other, but this government twists them beyond reality to suit its ruthless agenda, writes Zoe Williams.

8. Shock horror: Britain less secretive than ever (Times)

Revelations about police subterfuge and the alleged CQC cover-up show how much more open we are as a society, says David Aaronovitch. 

9. Osborne sets a trap for Labour on welfare (Financial Times)

Sticking to the government’s benefits cap will torture the opposition, writes Janan Ganesh.

10. Can the state be trusted to do anything right? (Daily Telegraph)

Revelations of unacceptable snooping and the draconian treatment of whistleblowers are making a mockery of the government's quest for 'transparency', says Allison Pearson.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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